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PROTOTYPE ISSUE

VETERANS Assisting our WHAT WE OFFER SO YOU cAN HEAL

What makes us unique SUPPORTIVE HOUSING Permanent

ABOUT US HOW WE BECAME WHAT WE ARE NOW

HOW YOGA Helps prevent relapse

BOOM, BUST, DRUGS

HOPE FOR The Future How alcohol affects epigenetics

Study says economic downturn lead to increase in substance use disorders

TRANSITION HOUSE the

FULL SERVICE TREATMENT AND RECOVERY PROGRAM

CALL TODAY

3800 5th Street St. Cloud, FL 34769

(407) 892-5700

THETRANSITIONHOUSE.ORG

Jessica Davis, MS, FCCM Chief Operating Ocer

Jennifer R. Dellasanta, ICADC, LADC, CAP Chief Quality Ocer/ Executive Director of Programs in New England

Tom Grin Chief Executive Ocer

Melissa Lucas Human Resources Director

Brett D’Aoust, MSW, CAP Chief Development Ocer

Dr. Jaymes Gonzales Director of Clinical Services

Dr. Syed Quadri, M.D. Medical Director/Psychiatrist

Jerey Wainwright Director of Work Release Programs

Yvette DeJesus Program Director of

Supportive Services for Veterans and Families THETRANSITIONHOUSE.ORG 3800 5th Street || St. Cloud, FL 34769 || 407-892-5700 OUR STAFF AT

Help for Veterans in Orlando

Currently our facilities can host 88 men & 8 women veterans

Our Homeless Veterans Residential Program offers services to both male and female veterans who suffer from chronic mental illness, PTSD diagnosis and substance use disorders. Currently our facilities can host 88 men and 8 women veterans.This program is for Veterans that may or may not have been in the judicial system due to their substance abuse or dual diagnoses and those with disabilities. We know these times can be difficult and with our staff and community of Veterans we are able to support you and help you regain a sense of independence. The Transition House Inc. focuses on a client-centered and client- friendly environment. We strive to accomplish your goals in a setting that makes you feel a part of your community.

Services include: • Full Residential Facility • Substance Abuse Treatment • Case Management • PTSD Counseling and Groups • Individual and Group Therapy Specific to Veterans Needs • Recreational Therapy • Employment Coaching, Counseling and Job Placement • Life Skill Training • Motivational Therapy

Program Details Our Veteran programs include full live-in facilities offering multi- man rooms, self-serve laundry and a full-service kitchen where the community is able to prepare meals that meet nutritional and dietary requirements for each client. We also offer kitchen orientation and groups on healthy eating, living and cooking. During your stay at our Veteran program each resident will be introduced to a Counselor that will work with them throughout their stay in the program. We offer different groups and individualized counseling related to, alcohol and substance abuse, anger management, batters intervention, self esteem groups, PTSD groups offered for both combat veterans as well as other traumatic events,

coping skills for re-adjustment into civilian life, employment readiness groups, interviewing skills, family groups, couples counseling and many more groups that are tailored to meet the individual needs of each of our clients. As each client progresses in their own treatment, they will be introduced to partners within the community such as Home Builders Institute (HBI) where individuals are able to sign up for a skills and job placement course. Veterans participating in the HBI program will receive training in all facets of facilities maintenance and general construction, including carpentry, electrical wiring, landscaping, HVAC, painting, plumbing, weatherization and OSHA 10. Program graduates earn an industry-sponsored and validated pre-apprenticeship credential.The Transition House also works with Career Source, Goodwill Industries and other similar organizations. Our partnerships in the community are significant so that we can promote overall wellness for our communities, so our agency gives back on a regular basis with volunteering for different community events.

During your stay at our Veteran program each resident will be introduced to a Counselor that will work with them throughout their stay in the program.

Where you can have a voice in the national discussion on addiction and recovery

About the Transition House

Our goal was to assist homeless men with alcohol or drug abuse diagnoses, and to prepare them for their return to society as productive and self-sustaining members of the community.

The Transition House Inc. was founded by Thomas Griffin in 1993 in St. Cloud, Florida. We began as a halfway house, providing substance abuse treatment and transitional housing for men. Our goal was to assist homeless men with alcohol or drug abuse diagnoses, and to prepare them for their return to society as productive and self- sustaining members of the community. In the following years,The Transition House Inc. was selected by the Veterans Administration to become a partner in assisting the growing number of homeless male veterans that were living on our streets of Central Florida. We continue to be a contracted VA program, serving veterans on their road to recovery and a happier life.

In more recent years, we have realized that behavioral health should be open to everyone. In 2013, we opened TTHI Counseling Center, offering therapy services for children, adolescents, and adults. Our highly qualified practitioners include a licensed psychiatrist, a degreed physician, a psychologist, licensed mental health counselors and certified additional professionals. We also provide individual and group therapy sessions, psychiatric mediation management, and psychiatric and psychological evaluations. Our number one goal is to help you find the practitioner and service that is right for you. Along with TTHI Counseling Center, we continue to provide services to the Central Florida homeless community and behavioral health in Kissimmee.The Transition House opened the first permanent supportive housing program in Osceola County, which we call Victory Village. Built in partnership with the Osceola County Human Services Department, Victory Village provides one, two or three bedroom apartments.

Our number one goal is to help you find the practitioner and service that is right for you.

OUR WOMEN’S PHP/IOP PROGRAM IS SPECIFICALLY DESIGNED TO ADDRESS THE NEEDS OF WOMEN WITH BEHAVIORAL HEALTH AND/OR SUBSTANCE USE ISSUES. WOMEN FACE MENTAL HEALTH AND SUBSTANCE USE ISSUES DIFFERENTLY; THESE ISSUES ARE MULTI-FACETED AND CAN HAVE A SIGNIFICANT IMPACT ON WELL-BEING. OUR SERVICES WILL PROVIDE INDIVIDUAL AND GROUP THERAPY IN A PARTIAL HOSPITALIZATION PROGRAM/ INTENSIVE OUTPATIENT FORMAT. ROOM AND BOARD IS OFFERED, IN ADDITION TO COUNSELING AND THERAPY.

WE OFFER A VARIETY OF SERVICES TO BEST FIT YOUR NEEDS, INCLUDING:

RELAPSE PREVENTION WELLNESS RECOVERY WOMEN’S RECOVERY BATTERED WOMEN’S RECOVERY ART THERAPY RELAXATION TECHNIQUES PARTICIPANT PROCESS GROUP RELATIONSHIPS/INTERPERSONAL SKILLS

AFFECT MANAGEMENT/DISTRESS TOLERANCE COGNITIVE BEHAVIORAL THERAPY (CBT) GROUP ACTIVE PARENTING

WE PROVIDE A COMFORTABLE AND SUPPORTIVE ATMOSPHERE, WHERE YOU WILL FIND A HIGHLY PERSONALIZED APPROACH TAILORED TO YOUR INDIVIDUAL NEEDS. WE HAVE YOUR GOALS IN MIND AND WILL HELP YOU GROW TO MEET THOSE GOALS.

TRANSFORM YOUR LIFE

TO BEST SUIT YOU AND YOUR NEEDS, WE OFFER MULTIPLE PROGRAMS AT VARIOUS FACILITIES. WE KNOW THE IMPACT SUBSTANCE ABUSE, ADDICTION, DEPRESSION, ANXIETY, ADHD, AND PTSD HAVE ON YOUR LIFE. WE ARE HERE TO GUIDE YOU TO FIND BETTER SOLUTIONS TO HEALTHIER LIVING.

407.892.5700

Discrimination, whether based on race, gender, or sexual orientation, has long been thought to be a contributor to substance abuse. Now a new study has confirmed the relationship between discrimination and addiction, but it’s also brought up many more questions that still need to be answered in order to improve treatment outcomes. Researchers at the University of Iowa recently completed a peer review study in which they looked at 97 previous studies on discrimination and alcohol use. Their goal was to summarize the collective knowledge researchers have uncovered throughout the years, and what they found confirmed in more detail what many had previously suspected.

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“Generally there is good scientific support, but the evidence is mixed for different groups

and for types of discrimination.” - Dr.Paul Gilbert, University of Iowa

overtly racist or sexist to another person. But less research has been done on what are known as micro-aggressions, small everyday occurrences that can rub a person the wrong way. That research is improving, but there are other factors that need to be more fully explored. While studies have looked at historical trauma in the African-American population, the concept has not been fully investigated with regards to Hispanic and Asian populations. “This notion of historic trauma could be really relevant to other groups, but it hasn't received much attention at all,” Dr. Gilbert says. “This is something we should pay attention to.” All of this adds up to the fact that treatment providers may be missing a key piece of the substance abuse puzzle.

The team found that discrimination did indeed lead to an increase in drinking frequency, quantity of alcohol consumed, and in the risk for alcohol use disorders. Researchers say drinking can represent a coping mechanism in response to the stress caused by discrimination, and several studies showed clients acknowledging this direct link themselves. But when looking at specific populations and types of discrimination, the picture becomes less clear. “The story is that generally there is good scientific support, but the evidence is mixed for different groups and for types of discrimination,” says Dr. Paul Gilbert, the study’s lead author. “We don’t really know comparing one type or one level to another.” For example, much research has been done on interpersonal discrimination where someone is

But just because the intricacies of how discrimination affects drinking aren’t yet fully understood, that doesn’t mean our current knowledge base can’t be helpful. Dr. Gilbert says simply knowing that experiences with discrimination can drive drinking could inform the way treatment providers interact with clients, opening new areas of their lives to explore during treatment. “It can serve as sort of an early warning or indicator,” Dr. Gilbert says. “For treatment providers, it’s worth looking at: is there something that may be keeping folks from accessing services or affecting outcomes?”

Dr. Gilbert says treatment providers should continue to address discrimination as part of a holistic approach to recovery. He says it will be up to researchers to fill

in the gaps to find the precise ways that discrimination affects drinking behavior. “We’ve got good evidence on this level of interpersonal discrimination,” Dr. Gilbert says. “We’ve gotten the low-hanging fruit, now it’s time to start working on the stuff that’s a little further up the tree.”

“It can serve as sort of an early warning or indicator.”

Boom, Bust, and Drugs Study says economic downturn leads to increase in substance use disorders When the economy tanks, drug abuse goes up.That’s the finding of a new study which shows the state of the economy is closely linked with substance abuse disorder rates for a variety of substances. The study, conducted by researchers from Vanderbilt University, the University of Colorado and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), found the use of substances like ecstasy becomes more prevalent during economic downturns. Researchers also found that other drugs like LSD and PCP see increased use only when the economy is strong. But for overall substance use disorders, the findings were clear.

“Problematic use (i.e., substance use disorder) goes up significantly when the economy weakens,” says Christopher Carpenter, one of the lead researchers. “Our results are more limited in telling us why this happens.” Researchers say it’s possible that people turn to substance use as a means of coping with a job loss or other major life changes caused by economic pressures, but their particular study did not pinpoint an exact cause and effect. Not all drugs are equal The study showed that a downward shift in the economy has the biggest impact on painkillers and hallucinogens. Rates of substance abuse disorders were significantly higher for those two categories than any other class of drug.

Researchers also found the change in disorder rates was highest for white adult males, a group which was one of the hardest hit during the Great Recession.They say more research is needed to determine exactly how the economy and drug use are related, but they say the study highlighted some key groups for prevention and treatment workers to target during future economic downturns.

“Problematic use (i.e., substance use disorder) goes up significantly when the economy weakens.” - Christopher Carpenter, Vanderbilt University

Slippery slope Despite some lingering questions, researchers were able to show the significance of the economy’s role in problematic substance use.The study showed that even a small change in the unemployment rate can have a tremendous impact on the risks for substance abuse disorders. “For each percentage point increase in the state unemployment rate, these estimates represent about a 6 percent increase in the likelihood of having a disorder involving analgesics and an 11 percent increase in the likelihood of having a disorder involving hallucinogens,” the authors write. Previous studies have focused on the economy’s link to marijuana and alcohol, with many looking at young people in particular.This study is one of the first to highlight illicit drugs, which given the current opioid epidemic, holds important lessons for those working to curb problematic drug use.

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When it’s needed most The study bears significant weight for treatment facilities and public policy makers in particular. During economic downturns, government agencies typically look to cut spending on treatment programs as a way to save money, something researchers say may be more costly in the end. “Our results suggest that this is unwise,” Carpenter says. “Such spending would likely be particularly effective during downturns since rates of substance use disorders are increasing when unemployment rates rise, at least for disorders involving prescription painkillers and hallucinogens.”

“Spending would likely be particularly effective during downturns since rates of substance use disorders are increasing when unemployment rates rise.” - Christopher Carpenter, Vanderbilt University

Permanent Supportive Housing Victory Village Victory Village is the permanent supportive housing program developed

by The Transition House, Inc. in partnership with HUD, Florida Economic Opportunities and Osceola County Human Services. Victory Village is a division of The Transition House, Inc. designed to provide permanent supportive housing and services that will allow families the ability to live independently and re-establish themselves into mainstream society. Our 20-unit apartment complex, located at 4596 W. Irlo Bronson Highway, addresses Osceola County’s need for permanent housing for very-low and low-income families. Victory Village is unique because the location allows families to live on a major bus line for access to adequate transportation, and within walking distance to shopping and services. Rental units range from one to three bedrooms and Victory Village includes a playground, laundry and community center onsite.

Victory Village is unique because the location allows families to live on a major bus line for access to adequate transportation, and within walking distance to shopping and services.

We can offer the following services for those that qualify: • Annual Assessment of Service Needs • Targeted Case Management, as needed • Education Services • Employment Assistance and Job Training Access • Life Skills Training, as needed • Mental Health Services • Substance Abuse Treatment Services, as needed For more information and to apply to live at Victory Village contact Yvette DeJesus by email at victoryvillage@thetransitionhouse.org or call 407-892-5700 x180. Qualified applicants may be eligible for security deposit assistance.

Eligibility Qualifications: To qualify for a Victory Village apartment you must be low income but have sufficient income to sustain rental payments which cannot exceed 30% of your monthly income and have no felony convictions in the past 5 years. No pets are allowed at Victory Village. See the chart below to see if you qualify.

Household Size 1

Very, Very Low Income $12,0502

Very Low Income $32,100 $36,700 $41,300 $45,850 $49,550 $53,200 $56,900 $61,800

Very Low Income $20,100 $22,950 $25,800 $28,650 $30,950 $33,250 $35,550 $37,850

2 3 4 5 6 7 8

$15,730 $19,790 $23,850 $27,9107 $31,970 $35,550 $37,850

Victory Village is a division of The Transition House, Inc. designed to provide permanent supportive housing and services that will allow families the ability to live independently and re-establish themselves into mainstream society.

ACTIVE PARENTING NOW

OUR 6 WEEKLY CLASSES ARE AVIALABLE IN ENGLISH AND SPANISH AT OUR KISSIMMEE LOCATION

THETRANSITIONHOUSE.ORG 407.892.5700

OUR MEN’S RESIDENTIAL PROGRAM PROVIDES SERVICES FOR THOSE DEALING WITH BEHAVIORAL HEALTH ISSUES, SUCH AS SUBSTANCE ABUSE, MENTAL HEALTH AND OTHER CO-OCCURRING DISORDERS. PRIVATE PAY OR INSURANCE ACCEPTED. WE OFFER A VARIETY OF SERVICES TO BEST FIT YOUR NEEDS, INCLUDING: SHORT TERM/LONG TERM RESIDENTIAL PROGRAMS CASE MANAGEMENT INDIVIDUAL COUNSELING GROUP COUNSELING PSYCHO-EDUCATIONAL GROUPS INDIVIDUALIZED TREATMENT PLANNING EMPLOYMENT SKILLS GROUPS ASSISTANCE WITH JOB PLACEMENT 12 STEP RECOVERY GROUPS EACH INDIVIDUAL HAS A HAND IN THEIR TREATMENT PLANNING TO ENSURE THAT THEY GET THE MOST OUT OF THEIR PROGRAM WHILE THEY ARE HERE. OUR STAFF WORKS HARD TO GUIDE CLIENTS TO BUILD A FOUNDATION THAT THEY CAN UTILIZE ONCE THEY MOVE ON. UTILIZING A STRENGTH BASED, EMPOWERMENT MODEL IS THE KEY TO GUIDING INDIVIDUALS TO BE SUCCESSFUL UPON COMPLETION OF THE PROGRAM. AND WE KNOW THAT YOU CAN BE SUCCESSFUL TOO.

407.892.5700

THETRANSITIONHOUSE.ORG

Bend But Don’t Break Yoga is being used to help people maintain recovery and avoid relapse

Yoga is no longer exercise your annoying, health-conscious friend won’t stop talking about.The ancient practice is now being used to help people recover from addiction. While scholars estimate yoga was developed sometime around 300 to 400 B.C., the practice hasn’t stopped changing over the last 2,000 years. A new wave of yogis are now helping people in recovery connect their spiritual and physical sides through yoga by combining the practice with more traditional 12-step elements. “It’s just a way of coming back to a sense of wholeness,” says Nikki Myers, a yoga therapist who helped develop the 12-step yoga system. “We use yoga as a process in order to bring that reintegration.”

Myers says she developed the system primarily as a means of relapse prevention. She says a typical 12-step yoga session would begin the same way most 12- step meetings do, with a focus on sharing and discussion of important recovery topics. Once the “meeting” portion of the session is over, the group will then move into a series of yoga poses designed to help participants focus on their physical recovery. “A focus needs to be on the body- based piece as well as the cognitive piece in order for wholeness to really be manifested,”Myers says. “Once you include those things, the whole idea is that these will begin to offer us a set of tools that we can use both on the mat in the yoga practice and off the mat when the triggers of life show up.”

“It’s just a way of coming back to a sense of wholeness.” - Nikki Myers, yoga therapist

The right tools Myers says the idea that yoga can provide a set of tools is critical as the practice of yoga is much more than the poses themselves. She says there’s also a focus on breathing techniques, a meditation of sorts, and a connection to one’s physical reactions that can prove vital when faced with difficult circumstances. Myers recalls how one woman who participated in 12-step yoga later found herself in a very stressful situation at home with her kids misbehaving and everything going wrong. She said she could feel the negativity boiling up inside her. It was the kind of stress that had triggered her to drink in the past, but the woman said in that moment she was able to relax and calm herself by focusing on her breathing and remembering the feeling of tranquility she had experienced in class. “It had a way of creating a space, giving her tools to create a space between her reactions and instead take a different neural pathway,”Myers says. “These are the kind of tools that we’re looking to have people use.” “A focus needs to be on the body-based piece as well as the cognitive piece in order for wholeness to really be manifested.” - Nikki Myers

Not a replacement Myers is quick to point out that yoga is not a substitute for traditional 12-step support, but rather an additional measure that some people may find helpful. She says some people have pushed back against the practice, but others have been enthusiastic about its power, with classes spreading across the country and even internationally. Myers says she hopes that one day 12-step yoga will be as common as other treatment programs. But she says as long as people are maintaining sobriety and finding wholeness within themselves, she’ll be proud of the difference her system has made. “We’ll tell people, ‘Notice this in your body, what it really feels like,’” Myers says. “Healing only happens in safe space.”

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3800 5th Street || St. Cloud, FL 34769 || 407-892-5700 THETRANSITIONHOUSE.ORG 3800 5th Street || St. Cloud, FL 34769 || 407-892-5700

TOM GRIFFIN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER

DR. GRIFFIN IS THE CEO AND FOUNDER OF THE TRANSITION HOUSE, INC. WITH OVER 25 YEARS OF EXPERIENCE IN THE ADDICTIONS FIELD, HE HAS LED THE AGENCY SINCE ITS INCEPTION IN 1993. DR. GRIFFIN ENCOURAGES HIS STAFF TO ADHERE TO ALL OF THE NEW EVIDENCE-BASED TREATMENT PROTOCOLS THAT ARE AVAILABLE IN THIS COMPLEX FIELD. DR. GRIFFIN IS A BOARD MEMBER OF FLORIDAALCOHOLAND DRUG ABUSE ASSOCIATION (FADAA), HE SERVES ON THE FLORIDA CERTIFICATION BOARD FOR CERTI- FIED ADDICTIONS PROFESSIONALS, AS WELLAS MANY OTHER INDUSTRY RELATED ORGANIZATIONS.

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