Dr Aaron Rosenberg Layout

specializing in addiction recovery

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500 W. Silver Spring Drive, Suite K200 Glendale, WI 53217

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O ur clinic provides treatment for patients from all walks of life and of varying ages. Many of our patients come to our clinic for treatment of addiction or mental health concerns. Others come for primary care. We strive to provide treatment of both physical and behavioral health in an integrated way as to avoid the fragmentation of care that is common today. Our doctor and our office staff are committed to helping support you in achieving your unique goals. Our primary purpose is to give you a sense of empowerment and help you maintain control of your life and your health. We believe in treating people as a whole and look at all aspects of their health while striving to support our patients in an integrative way that considers mental, physical and spiritual health together as one.

We believe in treating people as a whole

We Help You Realize Your Potential

Addiction Medicine At Milwaukee Recovery Associates we specialize in treating addiction with empathy. We try to understand what drives people to continue to use substances in maladaptive ways. We believe that what drives addiction is often buried deep in the subconscious of affected individuals. It is only when people are able to find, try to understand what drives their behaviors that they can break the chains of addiction.

Primary Care While our focus is on behavioral health, we also currently offer limited primary care services. We provide preventive services as well as care for chronic conditions, like diabetes, hypertension, heart disease, asthma, COPD, arthritis and much more. Call to see if we are right for your needs.

Behavioral Health Mental health is key to overall well-being. Here at Milwaukee Recovery Associates we believe that the best treatments are those that do not involve medication. We also understand that some psychiatric disorders have better outcomes when treated with medication and so their use is sometimes unavoidable. Our philosophy involves using the most effective medication that is best suited for the individual with respect to their overall health.

from

hell

We strive to provide treatment of both physical and behavioral health in an integrated way as to avoid the fragmentation of care that is common today.

to well We Help You Realize Your Potential

mkerecovery.net

Bipartisan Alternative Drug Treatment Program Signed Into Law

Developed by a bipartisan legislative study committee led by former Rep. Garey Bies and Goyke in 2015, the proposal passed the Assembly with unanimous approval last session but failed to garner support in the Senate. “I would like to thank my colleagues for their support in getting this important legislation accomplished. This bill will help save lives, repair families in need, and is another important step in combatting drug addiction in Wisconsin,” said Goyke. “Last summer, Rep. Goyke and I attended a family drug treatment court hearing in Milwaukee. Sitting through the hearings it was clear that lost in this epidemic is the harsh reality that children are losing their parents and being placed in the foster care system. This legislation gives us another tool to begin reversing this trend and I’m thankful Gov. Walker treatment courts are proven models Family treatment courts and juvenile

MADISON –Today, April 3rd, Gov. Walker signed Wisconsin Act 203, legislation that will pave the way for counties across the state to implement family drug treatment court programs. The legislation, authored by Representatives Jessie Rodriguez (R-Oak Creek) and Evan Goyke (D-Milwaukee), create the infrastructure for an alternative drug rehabilitation program that focuses on developing sober households. “All throughout the state and in every community we are witnessing the harmful effects of the drug epidemic, tearing families apart and depriving children of growing up in a loving, safe home,” said Rodriguez. “The family drug treatment court is an innovative program that will save lives by creating a path for people suffering from addiction to get the help they need to maintain a sober household that is safe for their children.” The family drug treatment court is an alternative drug rehabilitation program currently in use in more than 300 communities around the country. The court brings together social workers, attorneys, the judge and participants for a discussion focused on treatment and steps to reunifying the parent with children who have been removed from the home. “Family treatment courts and juvenile treatment courts are proven models that help individuals break the cycle of addiction, keep our communities safe, and save taxpayer dollars. I am proud to have worked on this legislation for two consecutive sessions following its introduction from a 2013 session Legislative Council Study Committee I served as Vice-Chair on with former Rep. Garey Bies,” said Goyke. Milwaukee County was the first in Wisconsin to use the program. Since its inception in 2011 it has yielded tremendous success providing treatment to more than 260 families in need.

signed this important bill today,” said Rodriguez.

This bill will help save lives

Although the legislation does not include funding, instead creating infrastructure for the program, DCF will have the opportunity to request funding in future budget requests.

Take Back My

MILWAUKEE COUNTY – On the first day of Spring, Take Back My Meds MKE, parents of young adults who have struggled with addiction, and environmental leaders urge residents to safely dispose of unused medicine they find during their Spring cleaning. Residents of Milwaukee County can take back their unused medicine on any day of the year at one of 76 locations in the county. A map of all locations with either a drop box or drug disposal envelopes can be found at takebackmymeds. com. Unused medicine is contributing to the opioid crisis in Milwaukee County. Eighty percent of heroin users have used unused medicine for non- medical purposes. Parents warn that unused medicine left in a home often starts or feeds a dangerous addiction. “My two sons found unused medicine to get high. Sometimes this happened at a neighbor’s house. Keeping unused medicine in your house is asking for trouble so please get rid of it in a safe and responsible way,” said Michelle Jaskulski of Franklin who is now outreach director of the Addiction Policy Forum.

Unsafe disposal of unused medicine also harms the environment. “When Milwaukee County residents flush unused medicine down the toilet it goes straight into Lake Michigan because MMSD is unable to treat it. Using a drop box or mail back envelope keeps unused medicine out of Lake Michigan, the source of drinking water in Milwaukee County,” said Amber Meyer Smith, Vice President of Programs and Government Relations for Clean Wisconsin. “Safely disposing of unused medicine during Spring cleaning at a drop box like we have at several Hayat Pharmacy locations is something each of us can do to combat the opioid crisis and protect Lake Michigan,” said Hashim Zaibak, CEO of Hayat Pharmacy a founding member of the Take Back My Meds MKE coalition. “Hayat is proud to be making it easier for people to take back their unused medicine.” Take Back My Meds MKE is a coalition of 15 community organizations and businesses dedicated to making it easier for Milwaukee County residents to combat the opioid crisis by safely disposing of unused medicine. A full list of the coalition’s members can be found at takebackmymeds.com.

Keeping unused medicine in your house is asking for trouble

People can and do recover from opioid use disorder. Call now if you or someone you know needs help. 414-847-6286

The brain’s reward system can be quickly disrupted by misusing prescription pain medications or using other opioids such as heroin. This can lead to opioid use disorder. The good news is that the brain’s reward system can be restored with treatment, including medication and strong support.

ENDING OPIOID MISUSE

500 W Silver Spring Drive Suite K200 • Glendale, WI 53217 | www.mkerecovery.net

We strive to provide treatment of both physical and behavioral health in an integrated way as to avoid the fragmentation of care that is common today.

500 W Silver Spring Drive Suite K200 • Glendale, WI 53217 | PH: (414)847-6286 | www.mkerecovery.net

At a major conference on opioid addiction, the National Institutes of Health announced

The NIH’s opioid research initiative, called Helping to End Addiction Long-Term, plans to cover a wide variety of projects: creating a more potent overdose-reversing medicine, studying what helps people stay sober, even developing a vaccine against opioid addiction. Over the past few years, research groups have tested such vaccines in mice and rats, but it’s not yet known when they’ll be ready for people to try. Drug development times can vary a lot, and many take more than a decade just to undergo the required human testing. Collins also said the NIH would enter into partnerships with private companies to develop pain medications without addiction potential. Collins had promised to launch such partnerships last year, at the same conference. Since then, the NIH has met with companies and decided on priorities together, but hasn’t yet embarked on any specific projects. >>>

Wednesday a new initiative to study the drug problem. A White House official, however, opted to focus on all that the administration has already done—not on what more it can still do.

Addressing a packed house at the National Rx Drug Abuse & Heroin Summit in Atlanta, Georgia, the different speakers offered different views of the federal response to a crisis that

continues to worsen. In 2016, more than 63,000 Americans died of drug overdoses, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates.

The largest portions of those deaths involved

synthetic opioids such as fentanyl, as well as heroin.

Francis Collins, the director of the NIH, said his agency plans to spend $1.1

billion this fiscal year on researching treatments for pain and opioid addiction. That figure includes an extra $600 million that Congress allotted the agency late last month. “What we want to do is push this forward at a much more accelerated pace,” Collins said during a speech.

In 2016, more than 63,000 Americans died of drug overdoses

Long-Term, plans to cover a wide variety of projects: creating a more potent overdose-reversing medicine, studying what helps people stay sober, even developing a vaccine against opioid addiction

After Collins spoke, Kellyanne Conway, senior counselor to President Donald Trump and the lead White House figure working on opioid addiction, took the stage. Perhaps because the White House had announced its latest opioid plan less than two weeks ago, there didn’t seem to be much that was new for Conway to share. Instead, she reviewed what the administration has already done, mentioning Trump’s call for the country to cut its painkiller prescriptions by one- third (which he issued in March); a government website where people affected by addiction can share their stories (which launched in November); and Trump’s declaration of a public- health emergency around opioids (which he issued in October).

Much of the conference audience—which is comprised of people who work in addiction recovery, public- health researchers, and law enforcement—gave Conway a standing ovation when she finished. And many of them filed out before the next speaker, a representative from the Office of National Drug Control Policy, came onstage. The office was established in 1988, to fight the Reagan administration’s War on Drugs, and is responsible for coordinating the nation’s drug- control activity. In February, Politico reported that Conway’s work on addiction had excluded experts from the office and confused lawmakers about who to talk to about drug problems. In this case, Conway’s speech seemed to have removed much of the audience’s appetite for the ONDCP speech, which, after all, didn’t announce anything new either.

milwaukee recovery associates 500 W Silv Spring Drive Suite K200

Glendale, WI 53217 414-847-6286 www.mkecy.net

Dead people don’t get into recovery

D. Waters Is Suboxone a Reasonable Treatment Option for Opioid Addicts? After twenty years of providing substance abuse treatment I can tell you that the ultimate goal of anyone battling an addiction is total abstinence. Every addict and alcoholic eventually figures out they can not control their usage, and moderation is unrealistic. Learning to live life on life’s terms is part of the process of learning to live abstinent. Self-help programs like Alcoholics Anonymous(AA) and Narcotics Anonymous(NA) do a great job of helping people understand their addiction, themselves, and effective solutions for coping with their disease. Dead people don’t get into recovery Opioid addicts are not terribly different from any other addict or alcoholic, except the risk of death by accidental overdose is huge. People are dying in droves from opioid overdose. The current heroin epidemic is even more dangerous than the pain killer epidemic it replaced. Relapse rates are tremendous. Unfortunately, it may take years before an individual addict is ready to give the 12-Step AA/NA

I’ve truly never seen anything work better, and when it works it’s a beautiful thing.

process the thorough try it requires to be effective. Therefore, Suboxone is a terrific option for chronic relapsers. You can’t generally get high from it, unless you haven’t used in awhile, or never used in the first place. You can’t overdose on it from use or abuse, and any other opioid you take while it’s in your system will be nullified and wasted.

Not the solution, but maybe a good step forward Suboxone is not the solution, but in many cases it’s better than nothing, and a good response for chronic relapsers who are risking death from overdose. At least the addict is getting some exposure to treatment which is more likely to lead to recovery in the long run. Suboxone buys people time and keeps them alive. There are quite a few people who’s funerals I’ve attended that I wish had gotten on Suboxone. You can’t treat the dead.

The Subs knock down the monster cravings almost completely, and people don’t go through the nasty withdrawal that’s so painful. Once dysfunctional people who couldn’t hold a job, or were constantly on the obsessive hunt for the next fix suddenly become much more functional, and the addiction looks like it’s in remission. They can work consistently, they stop chasing the drugs, they have more money and can care for themselves and their families, and their addiction doesn’t seem to be ruling their lives. It seems like magic! Very few people actually wean off Suboxone successfully Suboxone users often wrongly think they’re cured because they look and feel more functional. Then they think all they have to do now is wean down, or taper off the medication, which is what the clinic doctors help them manage over a number of months to years. The problem is they’ve done nothing about the underlying addiction and all the addictive thinking and coping that go along with it that drive the addiction from within. They haven’t developed any social support, or learned anything about themselves and their disease. We like to say that using, or putting some chemical into the body, is only a symptom of the underlying disease. Abusing substances is not the actual disease—just a symptom. As soon as they stop using the Subs the addiction is still there and ready to start expressing itself all over again through the many painful ways it does. Chemically addicted people cope with life stressors with chemicals—that is, unless they make some fairly significant changes. Suboxone changes nothing in the end. Suboxone changes nothing A combination of Suboxone treatment coupled with AA/NA (with Sponsor and Step work) is a great thing. At Crossroads Counseling we require anyone with a substance abuse issue

to attend AA/NA, obtain a Sponsor, and work the 12-steps. If they don’t we won’t sign-off on their program. Most Suboxone clinics require their participants to attend at least one counseling meeting a month. Unfortunately, this is almost completely useless unless the individual engages in a personal program of recovery that addresses not only the biological issues, but the social, psychological, and spiritual issues related to the disease, as well.

ONE DAY DAY ONE OR YOU DECIDE.

www.mkerecovery.net

THEY ARE MORE THAN YOU THINK LIKE YOU

80 percent of the babies born to heroin-addicted mothers are born addicts. Like mommy, like baby. www.mkerecovery.net

SAMHSA PUBLISHES BEST PRACTICES ON MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT FOR OPIOID USE DISORDER Best Practices

Treatment Improvement Protocol 63, “Medications for Opioid Use Disorder,”

reviews the use of methadone, naltrexone, and

buprenorphine, the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorders.

Data indicate that OUD-treating medications are both cost effective and cost beneficial

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has published new guidance to help health care professionals better understand medications that can be used to treat Americans with opioid use disorder (OUD). Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 63, “Medications for Opioid Use Disorder,” reviews the use of methadone, naltrexone, and buprenorphine, the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorders. TIP 63 provides guidance for health care professionals and addiction treatment providers on how to appropriately prescribe these medications and effectively support patients using these medications for OUD treatment. “We know that people can and do recover from opioid use disorders when they receive appropriate treatment, and medication-assisted treatment’s success in treating opioid use disorders is well documented,” said Dr. Elinore F. McCance-Katz, assistant secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use. “TIP 63 emphasizes that increasing access to medications to treat opioid use disorder will help more people recover, enabling them to improve their health, living full and productive lives.” TIP 63 is part of SAMHSA’s larger response to the opioid crisis. More access to treatment with OUD medications is critical to closing the gap between treatment need and treatment availability and an important public health strategy. Data indicate that OUD-treating medications are both cost effective and cost beneficial.

AFTER THE RAIN COMES THE RAINBOW

MILWAUKEE RECOVERY ASSOCIATES We’re here for you when you need us!

Call (414)847-6286 to schedule an appointment, or send us an email admin@mkerecovery.net and we’ll get back to you as soon as possible.

500 W Silver Spring Drive Suite K200 • Glendale, WI 53217 | www.mkerecovery.net

Don’t be Afraid to Reach Out

Mental health is key to overall well-being. Here at Milwaukee Recovery Associates we believe that the best treatments are those that do not involve medication. We also understand that some psychiatric disorders have better outcomes when treated with medication and so their use is sometimes unavoidable. Our philosophy involves using the most effective medication that is best suited for the individual with respect to their overall health.

Talkin’ ‘Bout My Generation

NIDA Researchers Develop Screening Tool for Teen Substance Use This article is a condensed version of a piece that originally appeared on the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) website.

Teens’ use of addictive substances often goes undetected by health care providers. But NIDA-supported researchers have developed a Brief Screener for Tobacco, Alcohol and other Drugs (BSTAD), to help spot teens’ problematic habits. In a recent study, BSTAD developers Dr. Sharon Kelly and colleagues at the Friends Research Institute in Baltimore examined the frequencies of use likely to qualify a teen for a diagnosis of an alcohol use disorder (AUD), nicotine use disorder (NUD), or cannabis use disorder (CUD). The frequencies proved to be surprisingly low, according to the researchers.

Teen drug substance use revealed For the study, the BSTAD survey employed a few, simple questions about teens’ use of alcohol, tobacco or drugs within the past year.The teens’ BSTAD responses revealed that 22 percent had used alcohol in the past year, 16 percent had used marijuana, 10 percent had used tobacco, and 3 percent had used at least one illicit substance other

than marijuana. (Original article by Eric Sarlin, M.Ed., M.A., NIDA Notes Contributing Writer) 28

“ Health care providers should have a one-on-one discussion with teens who indicate any substance use to assess level of risk, provide brief advice, and, if necessary, recommend further assessment for a treatment intervention. “

-Dr. Sharon Kelly, Friends Research Institute

Analysis of the data showed that almost all teens who reported on the BSTAD that they had consumed an alcoholic beverage on two or more days during the past year had an AUD. Conversely, teens who reported drinking on fewer than two days were unlikely to have this disorder.The corresponding BSTAD cut point for an NUD was nicotine use on two or more days during the past year and for a CUD was marijuana use on two or more days. BSTAD enables early detection Using these cut points, the researchers found that the BSTAD was highly sensitive. Ninety-six percent of teens with an AUD, 95 percent with an NUD, and 80 percent with a CUD would be flagged as likely in need of further assessment for a brief intervention or referral to treatment. BSTAD’s specificity was also high: 85 percent of teens without an AUD, 97 percent without an NUD, and 93 percent without a CUD reported use below the cut points, and so would be correctly classified. “Very low substance use frequencies were found to be optimal in identifying these disorders,” Dr. Kelly comments. The BSTAD does not distinguish

Researchers encourage regular screening Both the World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend screening all adolescent patients for substance use since problems later in life often originate in adolescence. Still, many providers do not regularly screen their patients for substance abuse. “Providers are extremely busy and need a quick and valid screening measure for identifying teens who use substances,” says Dr. Kelly. She and colleagues developed the BSTAD in response to a NIDA call for new tools to fill this need. To create the BSTAD, Dr. Kelly and colleagues added the questions about tobacco and marijuana to the widely disseminated National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism screen for youth alcohol use. In the validation study, the FRI research team administered the BSTAD in person to half of the participants, and the rest of the participants self-administered the instrument on an iPad. The teens reported a strong preference for the iPad. The iPad version offers the potential extra convenience that results can be automatically transferred into a teen’s electronic medical record. 

the severities of the disorders, she notes, so when it flags a teen, providers need to follow up with questions to determine appropriate interventions or referrals to treatment. Furthermore, Dr. Kelly says, “Health care providers should have a one-on-one discussion with teens who indicate any substance use to assess level of risk, provide brief advice, and, if necessary, recommend further assessment for a treatment intervention.” Providers also should rescreen teens regularly, because onset of substance use can occur abruptly during adolescence. Pediatrics recommend screening all adolescent patients for substance use since problems later in life often originate in adolescence. Both the World Health Organization and the American Academy of

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BREAK EVERY CHAIN MILWAUKEE RECOVERY ASSOCIATES

ADDICTION TIME WELL. RECOVERY is real, so is It’s to get

We believe in treating people as a whole and look at all aspects of their health while striving to support our patients in an integrative way that considers mental, physical and spiritual health together as one.

www.mkerecovery.net

It’s like killing yourself Don’t face opioid addiction alone. GET HELP TODAY.

500 W Silver Spring Drive Suite K200 • Glendale, WI 53217 | PH: (414)847-6286 | www.mkerecovery.net

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