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Counseling Services

specializing in addiction recovery

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7229 Ritchie Highway Glen Burnie, MD 21061

(410) 320-9967

KPCOUNSELINGSERVICES.ORG

the life

Renew you have been given...

Let us show you how: KP Counseling Services is a State of Maryland certified program with a staff of certified counelors with many years of experience in the field of substance abuse. We offer treatment in a group setting to individuals who are suffering from the disease of addiction. The goal of KP Counseling Services is to serve those persons addicted to drugs who are over the age of 18 that reside in the Anne Arundel County and surrounding area. Our mission is to support the recovery, health and wellbeing of our clients. We want to enhance the quality of life of our clients through a reduction or elimination of substance abuse. Human beings have the capacity to take responsibility for their actions once they learn the skills to change. KP Counseling Services will service those individuals according to state and federal laws and regulations. We feel that these goals can best be accomplished with an outpatient counseling program that exists in the community allowing our clients to maintain employment, family support and continuity in their lives without the use of illicit drugs.

The ultimate goal of this Program is to assist clients in becoming abstinent from all illicit substances, and to teach them how to maintain a healthy lifestyle through recovery. We support and encourage the client in their pursuit of a better quality of life. Until this goal is reached, the Program is committed to providing an array of services or referrals to address the needs of the client and their families. It is our hope that each client will be discharged with the skills to maintain abstinence from illicit substances, and the knowledge to build stable family relationships and reintegrate into the community in a positive way.

“The goal of KPCounseling Services is to serve those persons addicted to drugs who are over the age of 18 that reside in the Anne Arundel County and surrounding area.”

KP COUNSELING SERVICES 7229 Ritchie Highway Glen Burnie, MD 21061 410-320-9967 kpcounselingservices.org

Believe you can and you’re halfway there.

“What lies behind us and what lies before us are tiny matters compared to what lies within us.” - Ralph Waldo Emerson

Our Mission KP Counseling Services is an outpatient counseling program, that is focused on providing long lasting, high quality services for those suffering through substance abuse. We strive to provide this in an environment that is both welcoming and compassionate while addressing the needs of each individual. Services • Early Intervention Drug and Alcohol Education

• Outpatient Services • Intensive Outpatient

• Continuing Care • DWI/DUI Classes • Suboxone Maintenance • Drug and Alcohol Assessments • Services Offered in Spanish

Admission Information • Pre-Admission Telephone Screening • Assessments Scheduled by Appointment • All Information is Kept Confidential

• Maryland Medicaid Accepted • All Major Credit Cards Accepted

DON’T DRUG YOURSELF DOWN Our mission is to support the recovery, health and wellbeing of our clients. We want to enhance the quality of life of our clients through a reduction or elimination of substance abuse.

7229 Ritchie Highway Glen Burnie, MD 21061 410-320-9967

www.kpcounselingservices.org

It’s like killing yourself

Don’t Drink & Drive. GET HELP TODAY.

7229 Ritchie Highway • Glen Burnie, MD 21061 | PH: (410)320-9967 | www.kpcounselingservices.org

SAMHSA PUBLISHES BEST PRACTICES ON MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT FOR OPIOID USE DISORDER Best Practices

Treatment Improvement Protocol 63, “Medications for Opioid Use Disorder,”

reviews the use of methadone, naltrexone, and

buprenorphine, the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorders.

Data indicate that OUD-treating medications are both cost effective and cost beneficial

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has published new guidance to help health care professionals better understand medications that can be used to treat Americans with opioid use disorder (OUD). Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 63, “Medications for Opioid Use Disorder,” reviews the use of methadone, naltrexone, and buprenorphine, the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorders. TIP 63 provides guidance for health care professionals and addiction treatment providers on how to appropriately prescribe these medications and effectively support patients using these medications for OUD treatment. “We know that people can and do recover from opioid use disorders when they receive appropriate treatment, and medication-assisted treatment’s success in treating opioid use disorders is well documented,” said Dr. Elinore F. McCance-Katz, assistant secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use. “TIP 63 emphasizes that increasing access to medications to treat opioid use disorder will help more people recover, enabling them to improve their health, living full and productive lives.” TIP 63 is part of SAMHSA’s larger response to the opioid crisis. More access to treatment with OUD medications is critical to closing the gap between treatment need and treatment availability and an important public health strategy. Data indicate that OUD-treating medications are both cost effective and cost beneficial.

& ADDICTION

Sometimes loneliness can lead to addiction. Other times it can result from it. In either case,

it’s a slippery slope and dangerous relationship where one feeds the other if you’re not careful.

KP COUNSELING SERVICES 7229 Ritchie Highway Glen Burnie, MD 21061 410-320-9967 www.kpcounselingservices.org

I recently returned to Buffalo after living five years in Maryland where, in the first nine months of 2017, overdose deaths related to heroin, fentanyl and other opioids reached a new high of 1,501. In response to a mandate from Gov. Larry Hogan, my colleagues and I developed an opioid awareness program for all newly admitted students at Johns Hopkins University. The recent move by the Town of Tonawanda to equip its police officers with naloxone moves that department from being aware to taking action to save lives. Amid the nation’s opioid crisis, why are communities slow to adopt the lifesaving antidote naloxone? On April 5, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams issued an advisory recommending that more Americans carry naloxone – not just emergency responders and law enforcement personnel, but average citizens. Recent reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest that more than half of opioid overdose deaths are caused by synthetic drugs, including fentanyl. While heroin overdoses evolve in minutes to hours, fentanyl is faster acting and more potent, evidenced by that overdose evolving in seconds to minutes. In his study, “Characteristics of fentanyl overdoses – Massachusetts, 2014-2016,” Dr. Alexander Walley reported that among people who witnessed naloxone being administered, 83 percent said that two or more naloxone doses were used before the person responded. Of those who died from fentanyl overdoses, 90 percent had no pulse by the time emergency medical services arrived. [in Maryland] overdose deaths related to heroin, fentanyl and other opioids reached a new high of 1,501

might as well stick a bullet in your head... If you have been suffering from addiction, or know someone who is, treatment is available at KP Counseling Services.

www.kpcounselingservices.org

Addiction There is a way out

7229 Ritchie Highway Glen Burnie, MD 21061 410-320-9967 www.kpcounselingservices.org

Baltimore's 'Staying Alive' program found to be successful in combating overdoses By Carley Milligan – Digital Editor, Baltimore Business Journal Aug 22, 2018, 12:59pm The number of overdose reversal drug kits distributed and overdose reversals reported in Baltimore both increased between 2015 and 2017, according to data from the city's health department. A city audit of the department presented Wednesday found the Staying Alive Drug Overdose Prevention and Response Plan has been successful in its goal to reduce the rate of deaths from opiate-related overdoses in Baltimore. Self-reported data from the Baltimore City Health Department showed 13,151 naloxone kits, a medication that reverses the effect of an opioid overdose, were given out between 2015 and 2017. In each year, the number of kits distributed increased, starting with 1,909 in 2015, 4,721 in 2016 and 6,521 in 2017. Determining the exact number of successful overdose reversals is more difficult, the audit found, because some individuals do not report reversals due to stigma, lack of treatment or other reasons. The available data comes from the health departments and its teams throughout the city, showing that 1,439 reversals were reported in 2016 and 2017. Nearly 70 percent, or 979, took place in 2017. In an email, Baltimore City Health Commission Dr. Leana Wen called the figures "conservative" because it does not include reversals administered by Emergency Medical Services, the Baltimore City Police Department and unreported reversals by residents.

"Reporting accurate data is important, but even more so is getting naloxone into the hands of our residents to save lives," Wen said. Malcolm Green-Haynes, chief of finance and administration for the city health department, said the department is revisiting the reporting process for overdose reversals as well as its training protocol for both internal and external organizations providing naloxone kits.

"The "Staying Alive" program consists of several initiatives including the Syringe Exchange Program."

"Continuing to expand this program — based on its current success, and the trend line exhibited in the data from the audit findings — should be a priority for the city as it continues to address the opioid epidemic," Wen said. The "Staying Alive" program consists of several initiatives including the Syringe Exchange Program, which provides clean needles to reduce the frequency of HIV and other blood borne infections. It also includes training and access to naloxone though treatment centers in the city.

The opioid crisis in Maryland has continued to grow despite efforts to provide more addiction treatment and overdose prevention resources. Fentanyl-related deaths grew from 1,119 in 2016 to 1,594 in 2017, according to information released in July on unintentional drug and alcohol-related intoxication deaths from the Maryland Department of Health. Preliminary data from the first three months of 2018 indicate that there were 653 unintentional drug and alcohol-related intoxication deaths in Maryland. There were 579 opioid-related deaths, 500 of which involved fentanyl.

Baltimore City has seen an increase in the number of Naloxone kits distributed and the number of successful overdose reversals reported between 2015 and 2017.

www.kpcounselingservices.org

DON’T

TAKE CONTROL

The harsh reality is that opioids are killing thousands of people in this country, many of them young people

State legislators focused on opioid addiction treatment and prevention in schools and prisons Thursday while reviewing bills that would both use medications to thwart overdoses and assist in recovery. A bill making its way through the Legislature would require all schools with grades 9 to 12 to have policies for training nurses on how to administer naloxone. The schools would also have to keep a supply of the medication ready. “The harsh reality is that opioids are killing thousands of people in this country, many of them young people,” Assemblyman Vincent Mazzeo, D-Atlantic, bill sponsor, said in a statement. “Narcan has been proven to save lives. Having it readily available in schools can help ensure that our schools are ready to respond in every emergency situation.” Several South Jersey schools, including Millville, Mainland Regional High School, the Egg Harbor Township School District and the Ocean City School District, already have such policies in place. As of 2017, New Jersey ranked eighth in the nation for drug overdose deaths among people ages 12 to 25, according to the national nonprofit Trust for America’s Health. There have been an estimated 654 overdose deaths in New Jersey since Jan. 1, according to the Department of the Attorney General.

The bill would require that nurses be taught how to use the anti-opioid drug and have a prescription standing order for naloxone to keep it in supply. There were more than 14,300 uses of naloxone in the state last year, state data shows. If passed, the law would also provide immunity from liability for school nurses and other employees when an opioid reversal is performed. Nearby, members of the Assembly Health and Human Services Committee reviewed a bill sponsored by Assemblyman Herb Conaway, D-Burlington, that would require state correctional facilities to offer inmates naltrexone and naloxone just before their release. Naltrexone, known by its brand name Vivitrol, is a type of nonopioid medication- assisted treatment (MAT) for a substance-use disorder. Studies have shown medication-assisted treatments like naltrexone, methadone and buprenorphine have successfully been used to reduce relapse rates and help people maintain recovery from opioid addiction. Vivitrol completely blocks the euphoric and sedative effects of opioids. Recipients often need a monthly shot of the medication administered by a medical professional.

At John Brooks Recovery Centers in Atlantic City and Pleasantville, Vivitrol is just one medication-assisted treatment offered to inpatient and outpatient patients, but it is coupled with counseling and other treatment education. Alan Oberman, CEO of John Brooks Recovery Center, said that while the bill looks well intentioned, giving one shot of Vivitrol, which costs about $1,000, to an outgoing inmate without follow-up or counseling only buys that person about three or four weeks of sobriety before they may use again. “It’s more than just giving an injection, which at least requires a nurse to do it, and many outpatient programs in the community don’t have medical staff there to do it regularly,” he said. While methadone and buprenorphine are MATs that have been on the market for some time, Vivitrol is relatively new. John Brooks and the Atlantic County jail teamed up last summer to create the state’s first mobile methadone program for inmates. Oberman said they now offer inmates Vivitrol, but they haven’t yet had any takers.

Know the

importance of looking after your mental health in recovery.

www.kpcounselingservices.org | 410-320-9967

kpcounselingservices.org

SAY NO

Patients who wind up in emergency rooms because of drug use have far more types of drugs in their systems than the standard screening test used by hospitals is catching, a new study has found.

While the drug epidemic has focused on opioid use, two-thirds of patients who ended up at two University of Maryland Medical System emergency rooms in 2016 had multiple drugs in their systems — up to six were found in some urine samples. Emergency rooms tend to use a basic urine test that, like a pregnancy test, turns colors when it detects certain chemicals in drugs. The test is quick and inexpensive, but detects fewer than a dozen drugs, including opioids. The tests don’t detect drugs such as fentanyl and oxycodone, both of which have contributed to record overdoses across the country. Knowing what drugs a patients has taken can help doctors better decide a course of immediate treatment, as well as follow- up treatment such as rehabilitation, said doctors from the two emergency rooms and researchers from the Center for Substance Abuse Research at the University of Maryland, College Park. “We need to know the drug trends to know how to help people,” said Dr. Zachary D.W. Dezman, an attending physician in the emergency room at Midtown. Urine samples were tested from 106 patients at Prince George’s and 69 from the Midtown campus. Patients in Baltimore tested positive mostly for marijuana and fentanyl, a highly potent synthetic often added to heroin without users knowing.

The results highlight the complexities that exist in the current epidemic, said principal investigator Eric Wish, director of the Center for Substance Abuse Research. In some cases, dealers are mixing drugs without the knowledge of users. Many of the patients whose urine was tested misinformed doctors about what they had taken. “It used to be [drug users] didn’t want to admit what they were taking,” Wish said. “In this age they don’t know what they are taking.” Maryland’s drug-related deaths increase for seventh straight year, reach all-time high in 2017. “People are like walking drug stores now, there are so many drugs in their system,” Wish said. “A lot of the treatment now is focused on opioids. The important thing for the medical and treatment community to know is they are using far more than opioids.” Lawmakers and public health officials need to know the extent of fentanyl use to help reduce it, he said. “The emergency room is a place from which you can launch those public health efforts,” he said.

While in REBUILDING

YOUR RELATIONSHIP

from Recovery

Addiction

7229 Ritchie Highway • Glen Burnie, MD 21061 | PH: (410)320-9967 | www.kpcounselingservices.org

THE ROAD TO RECOVERY IS HARD ENOUGH KP Counseling Services is a State of Maryland certified program with a staff of certified counelors with many years of experience in the field of substance abuse. We offer treatment in a group setting to individuals who are suffering from the disease of addiction.

www.kpcounselingservices.org

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