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specializing in addiction recovery

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5397 Millington Rd. Millington, MI 48746

852 South Hooper St. Caro, Michigan 48723

(989) 871-6695

(989) 672-0784

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New Light Consultants, Inc and New Light Child & Family Institute are sister 501(c)(3) Non-Profit Corporations called to serve and “strengthen individuals and families through education, advocacy and family-centered treatment.” Originally founded in 1998 by Richard Watkins Jr., New Light has worked to provide services to the under and uninsured in Tuscola County for over 15 years. New Light Child & Family Institute (NLCFI) is a private, not-for-profit child placing agency whose primary focus is to assist children, and their families, who are placed in the foster care system due to neglect and/or abuse. The primary mission of NLCFI is to promote stabilization for children and their families to encourage integration and reintegration as a means to minimize out-of-home placements. The geographical outreach of NLCFI is comprised predominantly of Tuscola, Huron, Sanilac, Lapeer, Saginaw, Shiawassee and Genesee Counties and adjacent surrounding areas; wherein quality services can be provided to the foster parent, children and their families.

NLCFI does not discriminate on the basis of age, race, ethnic background, and specific characteristics of children served. As a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, New Light operates in an open and transparent manner that is consistent with legal requirements and assures the public has access to timely and accurate information concerning our organization. To request more information concerning New Light’s programs, activities, finances, or access to our most recent independent audit, please contact New Light through any of the following options: To make a request via email please submit your request stating which information you would like access to: admin@nlcfi.net or admin@ newlightconsultants.net. To make a request via phone please call (989) 871-6695 and our receptionist will take your request.

Shedding New Light Through Straight Talk.

Specialized Service F.I.G.H.T. - An intensive home-based 10 week treatment program for youth and their families experiencing substance use dependence, abuse and mental health disorders. This program uses a goal orientated approach that integrates the family throughout the treatment process. FIGHT begins with three sessions per week until gradually tapering down to one session per week. (For Court Referrals) S.T.O.P. - Millington offers ten week educational program for individuals with a first time alcohol or substance related offense. Offered in two group settings one for youth to 18 twelve week program designed to empower parents and help them to meet the specific needs of their family. Parents will obtain knowledge and skills that improve their overall functioning in nurturing parenting. Types of Mental Health Services • Individual Therapy • Group Therapy • Family Counseling & Support • Relapse Prevention • Prevention & Education Services • Intensive Outreach Program • Driver’s License Evaluations & Assessments • ADHD Evaluations • Psychological Evaluation (not Psychiatric) • Crisis Intervention Services years and the other for adults. E.M.B.R.A.C.E. - Caro offers a

Overview New Light Consultants, Inc (NLC) operates two locations to provide Mid-Michigan/Thumb Region with mental health services. Millington and Caro offices offer Group, Individual and Family Counseling for those experiencing a variety of issues including: depression, anxiety, relationship or family problems, coping with loss, substance use disorders, and other trauma. Licensed Professionals also provide treatment for: • Adult and child survivors of sexual, physical and emotional abuse. • Adult and childhood behavioral health disorders. • Other trauma related issues NLC does not offer prescription management but will work with your primary care physician to provide the mental health treatment.

• Domestic Violence • Anger Management • Aftercare • Women’s Specialty Services

Talkin’ ‘Bout My Generation

NIDA Researchers Develop Screening Tool for Teen Substance Use This article is a condensed version of a piece that originally appeared on the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) website.

Teens’ use of addictive substances often goes undetected by health care providers. But NIDA-supported researchers have developed a Brief Screener for Tobacco, Alcohol and other Drugs (BSTAD), to help spot teens’ problematic habits. In a recent study, BSTAD developers Dr. Sharon Kelly and colleagues at the Friends Research Institute in Baltimore examined the frequencies of use likely to qualify a teen for a diagnosis of an alcohol use disorder (AUD), nicotine use disorder (NUD), or cannabis use disorder (CUD). The frequencies proved to be surprisingly low, according to the researchers.

Teen drug substance use revealed For the study, the BSTAD survey employed a few, simple questions about teens’ use of alcohol, tobacco or drugs within the past year.The teens’ BSTAD responses revealed that 22 percent had used alcohol in the past year, 16 percent had used marijuana, 10 percent had used tobacco, and 3 percent had used at least one illicit substance other

than marijuana. (Original article by Eric Sarlin, M.Ed., M.A., NIDA Notes Contributing Writer) 28

“ Health care providers should have a one-on-one discussion with teens who indicate any substance use to assess level of risk, provide brief advice, and, if necessary, recommend further assessment for a treatment intervention. “

-Dr. Sharon Kelly, Friends Research Institute

Analysis of the data showed that almost all teens who reported on the BSTAD that they had consumed an alcoholic beverage on two or more days during the past year had an AUD. Conversely, teens who reported drinking on fewer than two days were unlikely to have this disorder.The corresponding BSTAD cut point for an NUD was nicotine use on two or more days during the past year and for a CUD was marijuana use on two or more days. BSTAD enables early detection Using these cut points, the researchers found that the BSTAD was highly sensitive. Ninety-six percent of teens with an AUD, 95 percent with an NUD, and 80 percent with a CUD would be flagged as likely in need of further assessment for a brief intervention or referral to treatment. BSTAD’s specificity was also high: 85 percent of teens without an AUD, 97 percent without an NUD, and 93 percent without a CUD reported use below the cut points, and so would be correctly classified. “Very low substance use frequencies were found to be optimal in identifying these disorders,” Dr. Kelly comments. The BSTAD does not distinguish

Researchers encourage regular screening Both the World Health Organization and the American Academy of Pediatrics recommend screening all adolescent patients for substance use since problems later in life often originate in adolescence. Still, many providers do not regularly screen their patients for substance abuse. “Providers are extremely busy and need a quick and valid screening measure for identifying teens who use substances,” says Dr. Kelly. She and colleagues developed the BSTAD in response to a NIDA call for new tools to fill this need. To create the BSTAD, Dr. Kelly and colleagues added the questions about tobacco and marijuana to the widely disseminated National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism screen for youth alcohol use. In the validation study, the FRI research team administered the BSTAD in person to half of the participants, and the rest of the participants self-administered the instrument on an iPad. The teens reported a strong preference for the iPad. The iPad version offers the potential extra convenience that results can be automatically transferred into a teen’s electronic medical record. 

the severities of the disorders, she notes, so when it flags a teen, providers need to follow up with questions to determine appropriate interventions or referrals to treatment. Furthermore, Dr. Kelly says, “Health care providers should have a one-on-one discussion with teens who indicate any substance use to assess level of risk, provide brief advice, and, if necessary, recommend further assessment for a treatment intervention.” Providers also should rescreen teens regularly, because onset of substance use can occur abruptly during adolescence. Pediatrics recommend screening all adolescent patients for substance use since problems later in life often originate in adolescence. Both the World Health Organization and the American Academy of

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TEEN HEROIN ADDICTION & TREATMENT Recognizing and treating heroin addiction in teens helps to ensure that they have the best opportunity for solid future and a sober, adult life.

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Highlights EMBRACE is a program designed to empower parents and help to meet the specific needs of their family. Parents and parent educators’ will work together to develop customized goals unique to their issues. Parents will learn new beliefs, knowledge, and skills that improve their overall level of functioning in nurturing parenting. The program consists of 12 individual sessions lasting 90 minutes. The sessions are designed using the evidenced based Nurturing Parenting Programs for parents and their children. Sessions are established by using a simple assessment tool upon intake. Sessions include Rationale for Corporal Punishment, Empathy, Empowerment, Bonding, Coping with Stress and Anger, Family Morals, Growth and Development, and Disciplinary Methods. The unique ingredient of this program is that it covers various aspects of change, which include working with Adolescent tantrums and difficult behaviors, Domestic violence, substance abuse and unhealthy relationships. Statistics show that many parenting obstacles are derived from past trauma and emotional pain from childhood, which contributes to dysfunctional parenting.

Objectives •Eliminate Abusive and Neglectful Behaviors •Increase Parent- Child Bonding; Increase Empathy and Compassion

•Reduce Child’s Negative Behaviors

•Increase the Nurturing Parenting Philosophy. Parents will obtain knowledge and skills that improve their overall functioning in nurturing parenting.

Both are dangerous.

FOCUS ON Life 852 South hooper street • caro, michigan 48723 new light consultants

CONSULTANTS, INC NEW LIGHT Today is a great day to be amazing! New Light Consultants, Inc and New Light Child & Family Institute are sister 501(c)(3) Non-Profit Corporations called to serve and "strengthen individuals and families through education, advocacy and family-centered treatment." www.newlightonline.net

Boom, Bust, and Drugs Study says economic downturn leads to increase in substance use disorders When the economy tanks, drug abuse goes up.That’s the finding of a new study which shows the state of the economy is closely linked with substance abuse disorder rates for a variety of substances. The study, conducted by researchers from Vanderbilt University, the University of Colorado and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), found the use of substances like ecstasy becomes more prevalent during economic downturns. Researchers also found that other drugs like LSD and PCP see increased use only when the economy is strong. But for overall substance use disorders, the findings were clear.

“Problematic use (i.e., substance use disorder) goes up significantly when the economy weakens,” says Christopher Carpenter, one of the lead researchers. “Our results are more limited in telling us why this happens.” Researchers say it’s possible that people turn to substance use as a means of coping with a job loss or other major life changes caused by economic pressures, but their particular study did not pinpoint an exact cause and effect. Not all drugs are equal The study showed that a downward shift in the economy has the biggest impact on painkillers and hallucinogens. Rates of substance abuse disorders were significantly higher for those two categories than any other class of drug.

Researchers also found the change in disorder rates was highest for white adult males, a group which was one of the hardest hit during the Great Recession.They say more research is needed to determine exactly how the economy and drug use are related, but they say the study highlighted some key groups for prevention and treatment workers to target during future economic downturns.

“Problematic use (i.e., substance use disorder) goes up significantly when the economy weakens.” - Christopher Carpenter, Vanderbilt University

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Slippery slope Despite some lingering questions, researchers were able to show the significance of the economy’s role in problematic substance use.The study showed that even a small change in the unemployment rate can have a tremendous impact on the risks for substance abuse disorders. “For each percentage point increase in the state unemployment rate, these estimates represent about a 6 percent increase in the likelihood of having a disorder involving analgesics and an 11 percent increase in the likelihood of having a disorder involving hallucinogens,” the authors write. Previous studies have focused on the economy’s link to marijuana and alcohol, with many looking at young people in particular.This study is one of the first to highlight illicit drugs, which given the current opioid epidemic, holds important lessons for those working to curb problematic drug use.

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When it’s needed most The study bears significant weight for treatment facilities and public policy makers in particular. During economic downturns, government agencies typically look to cut spending on treatment programs as a way to save money, something researchers say may be more costly in the end. “Our results suggest that this is unwise,” Carpenter says. “Such spending would likely be particularly effective during downturns since rates of substance use disorders are increasing when unemployment rates rise, at least for disorders involving prescription painkillers and hallucinogens.”

“Spending would likely be particularly effective during downturns since rates of substance use disorders are increasing when unemployment rates rise.” - Christopher Carpenter, Vanderbilt University

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Specific Thoughts to Cope with Cravings Training your mind to think positive thoughts is an important step in managing cravings and drug relapse prevention. A few ways to do this include: • Remembering how bleak things seemed when you were using drugs. • Thinking about the reasons you stopped using drugs and referring to the list of negative consequences that your drug use has caused. • Reminding yourself that your cravings are a normal part of recovery and that you do not have to give into them. • Visualizing the cravings as waves that you have to ride out. Urge- surfing is a technique that focuses your mind on the physical and mental experience of the craving, rather than giving in to the urge to use. • Being positive. Encourage yourself by remembering your successes each time your cravings become intense.

Negtive Feelings and Cravings People in early recovery are often taught that they are more likely to relapse when they are hungry, angry, lonely, or tired—otherwise known as the acronym, HALT. Stress and other negative emotions can also increase your cravings to use. Experiencing uncomfortable feelings, such as fear, boredom, anxiety, stress, anger, frustration, or sadness are especially difficult when you are in early recovery, making it appealing to turn to your drug of choice to manage these feelings. So learning how to regulate your emotions appropriately is another essential feature of an effective relapse-prevention plan. A few ways to help you regulate your emotions is speaking to a support group, exercising, or practicing other distraction techniques, such as reading, watching television, or listening to music while the feelings pass. Following a healthy daily routine can also help you reduce stress, so focus on managing your small daily stressors, eating a healthy diet, and getting adequate amounts of rest. People in early recovery are often taught that they are more likely to relapse when they are hungry, angry, lonely, or tired— otherwise known as the acronym, HALT.

Planning out each step you need to take to reach these goals is worth the time you invest in doing it because reaching these goals means actively building up safeguards for your recovery, rather than just hoping that challenges won’t arise. Celebrate your small milestones too. Self-help meetings are great at helping you do this and providing incentives to stay clean, such as coins or key tags earned for increments of sobriety. Surround yourself with people who celebrate with you.

RESTORE BALANCE

LIFE AND

989.672.0784 CONTACT US 852 South Hooper Street Caro, Michigan 48723 www.newlightonline.net

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1 out of every 5 teens has used prescription drugs to get high.

Teens are more likely to use prescription drugs than any other illicit drugs, besides marijuana.

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The harsh reality is that opioids are killing thousands of people in this country, many of them young people

State legislators focused on opioid addiction treatment and prevention in schools and prisons Thursday while reviewing bills that would both use medications to thwart overdoses and assist in recovery. A bill making its way through the Legislature would require all schools with grades 9 to 12 to have policies for training nurses on how to administer naloxone. The schools would also have to keep a supply of the medication ready. “The harsh reality is that opioids are killing thousands of people in this country, many of them young people,” Assemblyman Vincent Mazzeo, D-Atlantic, bill sponsor, said in a statement. “Narcan has been proven to save lives. Having it readily available in schools can help ensure that our schools are ready to respond in every emergency situation.” Several South Jersey schools, including Millville, Mainland Regional High School, the Egg Harbor Township School District and the Ocean City School District, already have such policies in place. As of 2017, New Jersey ranked eighth in the nation for drug overdose deaths among people ages 12 to 25, according to the national nonprofit Trust for America’s Health. There have been an estimated 654 overdose deaths in New Jersey since Jan. 1, according to the Department of the Attorney General.

The bill would require that nurses be taught how to use the anti-opioid drug and have a prescription standing order for naloxone to keep it in supply. There were more than 14,300 uses of naloxone in the state last year, state data shows. If passed, the law would also provide immunity from liability for school nurses and other employees when an opioid reversal is performed. Nearby, members of the Assembly Health and Human Services Committee reviewed a bill sponsored by Assemblyman Herb Conaway, D-Burlington, that would require state correctional facilities to offer inmates naltrexone and naloxone just before their release. Naltrexone, known by its brand name Vivitrol, is a type of nonopioid medication- assisted treatment (MAT) for a substance-use disorder. Studies have shown medication-assisted treatments like naltrexone, methadone and buprenorphine have successfully been used to reduce relapse rates and help people maintain recovery from opioid addiction. Vivitrol completely blocks the euphoric and sedative effects of opioids. Recipients often need a monthly shot of the medication administered by a medical professional.

At John Brooks Recovery Centers in Atlantic City and Pleasantville, Vivitrol is just one medication-assisted treatment offered to inpatient and outpatient patients, but it is coupled with counseling and other treatment education. Alan Oberman, CEO of John Brooks Recovery Center, said that while the bill looks well intentioned, giving one shot of Vivitrol, which costs about $1,000, to an outgoing inmate without follow-up or counseling only buys that person about three or four weeks of sobriety before they may use again. “It’s more than just giving an injection, which at least requires a nurse to do it, and many outpatient programs in the community don’t have medical staff there to do it regularly,” he said. While methadone and buprenorphine are MATs that have been on the market for some time, Vivitrol is relatively new. John Brooks and the Atlantic County jail teamed up last summer to create the state’s first mobile methadone program for inmates. Oberman said they now offer inmates Vivitrol, but they haven’t yet had any takers.

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We get scared when dad takes drugs. I don’t think he loves us anymore.

I N AN EFFORT to encourage new treatments for opioid addiction, the Food and Drug Administration plans to begin permitting pharmaceutical companies to sell medications that help temper cravings, even if they don’t fully stop addiction. The change is part of a wider effort to expand access to so-called medication-assisted treatment, or MAT. The agency will issue draft guidelines in the next few weeks. A senior agency official provided details of the proposal to The New York Times. the agency said it would soon publish two guidances, recommendations for drugmakers, on the issue.

The new approach was signaled Saturday by the health and human services secretary, Alex M. Azar II, in remarks to the National Governors Association. Mr. Azar said the agency intended “to correct a misconception that patients must achieve total abstinence in order for MAT to be considered effective.” While the Trump administration has generally supported medication-assisted treatment, Mr. Azar’s predecessor, Tom Price, was not completely on board with it. Mr. Price caused an uproar among treatment experts when he dismissed some medications that reduce cravings through synthetic opioids last spring as substituting one opioid for another. He subsequently walked back those comments, saying officials should be open to a broad range of treatment options. Mr. Azar, who took office late last month, said he would work to reduce the stigma associated with addiction and addiction therapy, and would not treat it as a moral failing. The opioid epidemic is considered the most unrelenting drug crisis in United States history. In 2016, roughly 64,000 people were killed by drug overdoses, including from prescription opioid painkillers and heroin. to correct a misconception that patients must achieve total abstinence in order for MAT to be considered effective. Noting federal data showing that only one-third of specialty substance abuse treatment programs offer medication-assisted treatment, Mr. Azar said, “We want to raise that number — in fact, it will be nigh impossible to turn the tide on this epidemic without doing so.” Mr. Azar’s comments echo those of the F.D.A. chief, Dr. Scott Gottlieb, who has made battling opioid abuse a priority for his agency. Dr. Gottlieb has moved to reduce opioid prescriptions by doctors and dentists and to promote more medication- assisted treatment, defined as drugs used to stabilize brain chemistry, reduce or block the euphoric effects of opioids, relieve physiological cravings, and normalize body functions. The F.D.A. has approved three drugs for opioid treatment — buprenorphine (often known by the brand name Suboxone), methadone and naltrexone (known by the brand name Vivitrol) — and says they are safe and effective combined with counseling and other support. But the agency said it would soon publish two guidances, recommendations for drugmakers, on the issue.

new light consultants, inc 5397 Millingt Rd Millingt, MI 48746 989-871-6695 www.newlightline.net

It’s like killing yourself Don’t face opioid addiction alone. GET HELP TODAY.

5397 Millington Rd • Millington, MI 48746 | PH: (989)871-6695 | www.newlightonline.net

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