National Behavioral Health layout

specializing in addiction recovery

CALL TODAY

204A Bevins Lane Georgetown, KY 40324

502.603.9881

NATIONALBEHAVIORALHEALTH.COM

bout

National Behavioral Health is a behavioral health facility located in Georgetown, KY. Our primary mission is to improve mental health and treat any related disorders. Our treatment philosophy is simple: everyone is unique, and therefore different types of treatment work for different people. We customize your treatment to meet your individual counseling and medication needs. NATIONAL BEHAVIORAL HEALTH MEDICATION

SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT Dr. Ali is also specialized in Addiction Psychiatry. He treats all substance use disorders and any related comorbidities including but not limited to Alcohol

SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELING Addiction Counseling is the specialty of helping people recover from their addictions. Dr. Ali provides advice, treatment and ongoing support necessary for patients with substance use disorders. Dr. Ali treats and supports

MANAGEMENT Dr. Ali is a specialist in psychiatry which is the branch of science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of mental illness. Dr. Ali prescribes FDA approved medications for

mental health conditions and substance use disorders.

use disorder, Opioids use disorder and Tobacco use disorder.

patients in a one-on-one environment.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) announced it is awarding more than $28.6 million in additional funding to 44 states and the District of Columbia to support their responses to the opioid overdose epidemic, including state prescription drug monitoring programs (PDMPs). CDC said the funds will be used “to strengthen prevention efforts and better track opioid- related overdoses.” Previously CDC announced in July $12 million in grants to states to support overdose prevention activities.

“This additional CDC funding to states, who are on the frontlines of the opioid overdose epidemic, is critical to help them scale up prevention efforts to fight this crisis and save lives.”

“One piece of HHS’s five-point strategy for combating the opioid crisis is improving our understanding of the epidemic through better public health data,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, M.D. “The expansion of these CDC programs, made possible by legislation President Trump signed earlier this year, is an important piece of our commitment to helping states combat the scourge of opioid addiction and overdose.” “to strengthen prevention efforts and better track opioid-related overdoses” Increased funding for opioids in the fiscal year (FY) 2017 Omnibus Appropriations bill is allowing CDC to support all states funded under its Overdose Prevention in States (OPIS) effort, which includes three programs that equip states with resources needed to address the epidemic. The three programs are: Prescription Drug Overdose: Prevention for States (PfS), Data-Driven Prevention Initiative (DDPI), and Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance(ESOOS).

Under the Prescription Drug Overdose: Prevention for States (PfS) program, $19.3 million in funding will go to 27 states in program expansion supplemental awards. Under the Data-Driven Prevention Initiative (DDPI), $4.6 million in funding will go to 12 states and Washington, D.C. in program expansion supplemental awards. Funds will be used by states to scale up prevention activities that include increasing the use of PDMPs and improving clinical feedback from these systems, expanding the reach of messages about the risks associated with opioids, and other practices such as conducting overdose fatality reviews to improve prevention efforts. PfS supplemental awardees are: Arizona, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Maryland, Massachusetts, Nebraska, Nevada, New Mexico, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, West Virginia and Wisconsin. DDPI supplemental awardees are: Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Michigan, Minnesota, Montana, New Jersey, South Dakota and Washington, D.C. Under the Enhanced State Opioid Overdose Surveillance (ESOOS) program, $4.7 million will go to 32 states and Washington, D.C. to better track and prevent opioid-involved nonfatal and fatal overdoses. Funds will be used by states to directly support medical examiners and coroners, including funds for comprehensive toxicology testing and for enhancing their surveillance activities. ESOOS supplemental awardees are: Alaska, California, Connecticut, Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Illinois, Indiana, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, Minnesota, Missouri, Nevada, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New Mexico, North Carolina, Ohio, Oklahoma, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Tennessee, Utah, Vermont, Virginia, Washington, Washington, D.C., West Virginia and Wisconsin.

Are you missing 18%* of your Patients’ Positive Opioid Test Results? You may be without High Sensitivity Definitive Testing.

NATIONALBEHAVIORALHEALTH.COM

NEED HELP? NATIONAL BEHAVIORAL HEALTH WE MAKE HOPE AND JOY POSSIBLE AGAIN WHEN ADDICTION TEARS AT YOUR FAMILY. COME GET HELP 502.603.9881 204A BEVINS LANE GEORGETOWN, KY 40324

SAMHSA PUBLISHES BEST PRACTICES ON MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT FOR OPIOID USE DISORDER Best Practices

Treatment Improvement Protocol 63, “Medications for Opioid Use Disorder,”

reviews the use of methadone, naltrexone, and

buprenorphine, the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorders.

Data indicate that OUD-treating medications are both cost effective and cost beneficial

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has published new guidance to help health care professionals better understand medications that can be used to treat Americans with opioid use disorder (OUD). Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 63, “Medications for Opioid Use Disorder,” reviews the use of methadone, naltrexone, and buprenorphine, the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorders. TIP 63 provides guidance for health care professionals and addiction treatment providers on how to appropriately prescribe these medications and effectively support patients using these medications for OUD treatment. “We know that people can and do recover from opioid use disorders when they receive appropriate treatment, and medication-assisted treatment’s success in treating opioid use disorders is well documented,” said Dr. Elinore F. McCance-Katz, assistant secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use. “TIP 63 emphasizes that increasing access to medications to treat opioid use disorder will help more people recover, enabling them to improve their health, living full and productive lives.” TIP 63 is part of SAMHSA’s larger response to the opioid crisis. More access to treatment with OUD medications is critical to closing the gap between treatment need and treatment availability and an important public health strategy. Data indicate that OUD-treating medications are both cost effective and cost beneficial.

Contact Us 502.603.9881

ABOUT US...

National Behavioral Health is a behavioral health facility located in Georgetown, KY. Our primary mission is to improve mental health and treat any related disorders. Our treatment philosophy is simple: everyone is unique, and therefore different types of treatment work for different people. We customize your treatment to meet your individual counseling and medication needs.

204A Bevins Lane Georgetown, KY 40324 | nationalbehavioralhealth.com

SUBSTANCE ABUSE COUNSELING

GET HELP TODAY!

WWW.FRONTRANGEMD.COM

Addiction Counseling is the specialty of helping people recover from their addictions. Dr. Ali provides advice, treatment and ongoing support necessary for patients with substance use disorders. Dr. Ali treats and supports patients in a one-on-one environment.

204A Bevins Lane Georgetown, KY 40324 502.603.9881 CALL NOW

Dead people don’t get into recovery

D. Waters Is Suboxone a Reasonable Treatment Option for Opioid Addicts? After twenty years of providing substance abuse treatment I can tell you that the ultimate goal of anyone battling an addiction is total abstinence. Every addict and alcoholic eventually figures out they can not control their usage, and moderation is unrealistic. Learning to live life on life’s terms is part of the process of learning to live abstinent. Self-help programs like Alcoholics Anonymous(AA) and Narcotics Anonymous(NA) do a great job of helping people understand their addiction, themselves, and effective solutions for coping with their disease. Dead people don’t get into recovery Opioid addicts are not terribly different from any other addict or alcoholic, except the risk of death by accidental overdose is huge. People are dying in droves from opioid overdose. The current heroin epidemic is even more dangerous than the pain killer epidemic it replaced. Relapse rates are tremendous. Unfortunately, it may take years before an individual addict is ready to give the 12-Step AA/NA

I’ve truly never seen anything work better, and when it works it’s a beautiful thing.

process the thorough try it requires to be effective. Therefore, Suboxone is a terrific option for chronic relapsers. You can’t generally get high from it, unless you haven’t used in awhile, or never used in the first place. You can’t overdose on it from use or abuse, and any other opioid you take while it’s in your system will be nullified and wasted.

Not the solution, but maybe a good step forward Suboxone is not the solution, but in many cases it’s better than nothing, and a good response for chronic relapsers who are risking death from overdose. At least the addict is getting some exposure to treatment which is more likely to lead to recovery in the long run. Suboxone buys people time and keeps them alive. There are quite a few people who’s funerals I’ve attended that I wish had gotten on Suboxone. You can’t treat the dead.

The Subs knock down the monster cravings almost completely, and people don’t go through the nasty withdrawal that’s so painful. Once dysfunctional people who couldn’t hold a job, or were constantly on the obsessive hunt for the next fix suddenly become much more functional, and the addiction looks like it’s in remission. They can work consistently, they stop chasing the drugs, they have more money and can care for themselves and their families, and their addiction doesn’t seem to be ruling their lives. It seems like magic! Very few people actually wean off Suboxone successfully Suboxone users often wrongly think they’re cured because they look and feel more functional. Then they think all they have to do now is wean down, or taper off the medication, which is what the clinic doctors help them manage over a number of months to years. The problem is they’ve done nothing about the underlying addiction and all the addictive thinking and coping that go along with it that drive the addiction from within. They haven’t developed any social support, or learned anything about themselves and their disease. We like to say that using, or putting some chemical into the body, is only a symptom of the underlying disease. Abusing substances is not the actual disease—just a symptom. As soon as they stop using the Subs the addiction is still there and ready to start expressing itself all over again through the many painful ways it does. Chemically addicted people cope with life stressors with chemicals—that is, unless they make some fairly significant changes. Suboxone changes nothing in the end. Suboxone changes nothing A combination of Suboxone treatment coupled with AA/NA (with Sponsor and Step work) is a great thing. At Crossroads Counseling we require anyone with a substance abuse issue

to attend AA/NA, obtain a Sponsor, and work the 12-steps. If they don’t we won’t sign-off on their program. Most Suboxone clinics require their participants to attend at least one counseling meeting a month. Unfortunately, this is almost completely useless unless the individual engages in a personal program of recovery that addresses not only the biological issues, but the social, psychological, and spiritual issues related to the disease, as well.

...BUILDING A BRIDGE TODAY FOR A BETTER TOMORROW

NATIONALBEHAVIORALHEALTH.COM 204A Bevins Lane • Georgetown, KY 40324 HAVE A BETTER TOMORROW WITH OUR HELP TODAY! (502)603-9881

“We were surprised that morphine was able to induce these really long-lasting changes,” says Dr. Peter Grace, the study’s lead author. Dr. Grace says the cause of the chronic pain increase has to do with cells that form part of the immune system. He says if those areas could be isolated or their eects reduced, the resulting pain may not be as great. “If it does turn out to be a relevant issue to patients, then what our study suggests is that targeting the immune system may be the key to avoiding these kinds of eects,” Dr. Grace says. “Opioids could essentially work better if we could shut down the immune system in the spinal cord.” e team’s research only looked at spinal cord injuries and morphine, and did not study other opioids that are commonly prescribed to patients experiencing pain. But he said it’s likely drugs like Vicodin or OxyContin could aect other parts of the body in a similar way. “While we haven't actually tested other opioids in this particular paradigm, we predict that we would see similar eects,” Dr. Grace says.

ain relievers are supposed to relieve pain. It sounds simple enough, but new research suggests a common pain medication may actually be prolonging chronic pain. Morphine is an opioid painkiller commonly prescribed in hospitals and clinics, and while it is eective in the short term, doctors don’t always consider the potential consequences for pain down the road.at’s why a team of researchers based out of the University of Colorado - Boulder set out to study how morphine treatment aects chronic pain, and found some troubling results. e team, which used mice with spinal cord injuries, found that in mice not given morphine, their pain thresholds went back to normal about four to ve weeks after the injury. But mice who were given morphine didn’t see their pain levels return to normal until around 10 to 11 weeks, meaning the use of morphine eectively doubled the length of their chronic pain. P

28

Chronic problem Chronic pain can be debilitating for many people facing serious health problems, and it can also be a key factor in substance abuse. Many people report developing a dependence on opioids after having them prescribed for an injury. But new research suggests the number of people who develop dependency issues because of chronic pain may be far higher than people realize. A study from researchers at Boston University looked at a group of nearly 600 people who had either used illicit substances or misused prescription drugs.

ey found that 87 percent reported suering from chronic

pain, with 50 percent of those people rating their pain as severe.ey also found that 51 percent of people who had used illicit drugs like marijuana, cocaine and heroin had done so to treat their pain. While many prevention eorts focus on recreational users, the numbers suggest that chronic pain plays just as prominent a role in substance abuse. “Many patients using illicit drugs, misusing prescription drugs and using alcohol reported doing so in order to self-medicate their pain,” the authors of the study wrote. “Pain needs to be addressed when patients are counseled about their substance use.”

Brought toyou by:

Medication Management

CONTACT US 502-603-9881 204A Bevins Lane Georgetown, KY 40324

Dr. Ali is a specialist in psychiatry which is the branch of science concerned with the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of mental illness. Dr. Ali prescribes FDA approved

medications for mental health conditions and substance use disorders. For more information please visit our website at nationalbehavioralhealth.com

EVERY NEW DAY IS ANOTHER CHANCE TO CHANGE YOUR LIFE

NATIONALBEHAVIORALHEALTH.COM

Dr. Ali is also specialized in Addiction Psychiatry. He treats all substance use disorders and any related comorbidities including but not limited to Alcohol use disorder, Opioids use disorder and Tobacco use disorder. SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT

COME GET HELP! 204A Bevins Lane Georgetown, KY 40324 502.603.9881

OPIATE PROGRAM BREAKING THE CYCLE

Why are we non-12-step? We’d like to state at the outset that this does not mean that we are Anti-AA. (See “An Open Letter to Our Friends at AA.”) We believe in anything that works, and we believe that individuals should have a variety of choices from which to choose.

Since 1995, here at Assisted Recovery, we have seen our

approach work even when the 12- step approach had previously failed.

Most people are already familiar with AA’s primarily spiritual program of recovery (turning your will and your life over to a Higher Power). AA offers many social support resources, in the form of self-help group meetings that are available nearly everywhere… plus dances, pot-luck suppers, retreats and conventions where members can meet other sober people. AA also offers some limited psychological tools, mostly in the form of simple slogans such as “One Day at a Time,” which are easy to understand and remember. Finally Evidence- Based Treatment for Opiates that will empower you to quit using and make positive changes in your life. As a recognized leader in the non-12-Step recovery movement, Assisted Recovery’s founder and Director Lloyd Vacovsky was interviewed for the Penn and Teller Show on the Showtime Cable TV network. The episode about AA, entitled “12 Stepping”, which began airing in September 2004. In this episode, Penn and Teller were particularly critical of AA, and of government-mandated attendance to what is essentially a religious program. (Note: Suggested only for mature audiences and those who are not offended by foul language.)

Assisted Recovery is a leader in providing state of the art treatment for opiate dependence. ARCA addresses the biological, psychological and social components of the recovery process. This program fully integrates medications with psychosocial support. This type of integrated program is an example of the Pennsylvania Model of Recovery. The model is so named in recognition of the work of the University of Pennsylvania and in particular Dr. Joseph Volpicelli, MD, PhD (author of Recovery Options) Assisted Recovery is a fully licensed behavioral health agency, Arizona BH 2620. We recognize that most individuals whom become dependent upon drugs and or alcohol have core psychological issues which they self-medicate for. Stopping drug use does not stop the cravings and the thought processes that lead an individual to relapse. ARCA provides effective individual and group cognitive behavioral therapy. Treatment is provided in an Out Patient professional setting. With Suboxone®, we can safely and effectively detox an individual from opiate dependence comfortably in an Out Patient environment. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy is provided and is an integral component of the Assisted Recovery Pennsylvania Model program. It fully meets the counseling requirement that is mandated by the Food & Drug Administration for individuals taking Suboxone®. ARCA recognizes the anxiety and depression associated with detoxing from opiates. Further that benzodiazapine’s are not an appropriate response. ARCA utilizes ondansetron as a safe and effective alternative to a benzodiazapine. As soon as a client is detoxed, ARCA strongly reccomends the use of Vivitrol(r) which is injectible naltrexone. Vivitrol(r) blocks the ability to use any type of opiate for 30 days. Vivitrol(r) is an escential tool that clearly is often the differance between success and failure. ARCA works closely with Vivitrol’s manufacturer Alkermes Pharmaceuticals to facilitate the delivery of Vivitrol(r) to the client. Vivitrol(r) provides the assurance that an individual cannot use an opiate for 30 days. The Assisted Recovery Program fully integrates medications with psychosocial support. This type of integrated program is an example of the Pennsylvania Model of Recovery. The model is so named in recognition of the work of the University of Pennsylvania and in particular Dr. Joseph Volpicelli, MD, PhD (author of Recovery Options) The Psychological component is addressed primarily with the use of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy as developed by Dr. Albert Ellis, PhD of the Albert Ellis Institute of New York City. Suboxone® protocols offer opiate dependent individuals a safe, effective and reasonable path to abstinance and recovery.

Since 1995, here at Assisted Recovery, we have seen our approach work even when the 12-step approach had previously failed

204A Bevins Lane • Georgetown, KY 40324

GET WELL WITH US TODAY 502.603.9881

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that overdoses from prescription opioids drive the 15-year increase in opioid overdose deaths. Opioids are drugs that are extremely powerful and lead to uncontrollable addiction, even in good, honest people. If you’re a resident of Alpharetta, Roswell, John’s Creek, Milton, or located anywhere in the metropolitan Atlanta, Georgia area, who’s ready to be free of your addiction, contact the trusted staff at Detox with Dignity, an affiliate of W.I.S.E. Medical Centers. Call the office to make an appointment, or use the online booking agent.

SUBSTANCE ABUSE Q & A

How do I know if I have an unhealthy addiction? Not all addicts are recreational abusers. You may question your use of the drugs if you’re unable to stop using the drug after the cause of the pain has resolved. If you have a past or a family history of substance abuse, your risk of addiction to opioids is great, even when a doctor prescribes pain medications for a valid condition. Do you use medications to help with withdrawal symptoms while detoxing from opioids? There is no single correct way to detox off of opioids. Sometimes sedatives, anti- nausea, anti-depressants, and blood pressure medications are helpful in different stages of the rehabilitation process. Some patients must taper off the opioids gradually before starting any detox medications. One of the most successful medications for detox is called Suboxone—containing the active ingredient buprenorphine. You start on Suboxone® once withdrawal has begun. Dr. Locke may also recommend naltrexone, sold under the brand name Vivitrol®, after all opioids are out of your system. Vivitrol discourages the resumption of opioid use.

What are the differences between tolerance, physical dependence, and addiction? Tolerance refers to a drug’s becoming less effective over time. Physical dependence describes a situation in which a person develops symptoms and signs of withdrawal, including sweating, nausea, diarrhea, anxiety, and rapid heart rate, when they cease taking the drug or lower the dosage. Addiction is a condition in which a person has lost control over the use of the drug. They continue to use it even when the drug harms themselves and their relationships with others. People who are addicted may obtain pain medications from non-medical sources, alter oral formulations of prescription medications, or snort or inject medications.

What are opioids? Opioids are drugs that affect the body in the same way that opium does. Examples of opioids include:

Oxycodone Hydrocodone

Fetanyl Heroin

They’re often prescribed for chronic pain or to help you recover from surgery. You may know them from their brand names, such as Vicodin®, Percocet®, and OxyContin®. For people with pain, opioids are very effective, and most patients don’t become addicted to them. However, in some people, opioid dependence becomes an unexpected side effect of well-intentioned pain treatment.

Let's bring happiness and positivity back to your life with our counseling.

NATIONAL BEHAVIORAL HEALTH Give us a call today! 204A Bevins Lane Georgetown, KY 40324 nationalbehavioralhealth.com | 502-603-9881

The highest level of Quality, Customer Service and continuous compliance are always met.

Contact Us Today! 502.603.9881 nationalbehavioralhealth.com

Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32

Powered by