608 FALL 2016 FB

MAGAZINE

FALL 2016

NEW PACK LEADER MEETMADISON COLLEGE'S NEW HEADMEN'S BASKETBALL COACH

CREATING

MORE THAN A GAME CREATING OPPORTUNITIES FOR CITY'S YOUTH

CHANGE Fighting for social justice

MADISON MAVERICK EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH DALLAS MAVERICKS' WES MATTHEWS

BIG MAN

EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW WITH RON DAYNE

30 Bridge Builder Boys & Girls Club leader makes presence felt 34 Attack Your Lane Kilo SkitL’z raps for progress 36 Stirring Up the Melting Pot Through music and manage- ment, P. Swagger unites artists for max exposure 38 Tapping on the Window of Opportunity Music is a lifestyle for local hip hop artist Rose Mary 40 Artist & then Some Local singer blends experience and influences in tireless pur- suit of passion 44 Bylines that Bridge Gaps Deidre Green empowers stu- dents to express their views on the achievement gap 46 The Business of School Spirit Ron Brent taps into a new market by helping schools sell their brand 48 Madison’s Maverick Wes Mathews stays true to his roots 52 Organizing for Change Madison minister rallies community power to create lasting change 54 Painting Yellows in the Dark Artist celebrates black joy during national racial strife 56 Crafting a New Narrative Program engages LGBTQ juvenile inmates 60 Getting Sober Why getting sober is way scarier than telling jokes on stage

FALL 2016

08 A Star in the Hood Clyde Stubblefield’s universal drum influence 10 Leaving a Lasting Impact Retiring UW instructor made his presence felt 12 The Face of Progress Motivational coach unites black community and encourages change 14 An Extraordinary Life Memoir chronicles journey from sharecropping to making Madison history 18 Leader of the Pack Madison College hires new head men’s basketball coach 20 Big Man on Campus Heisman Trophy winner stays close to home following NFL career 22 More than a Game Former UW basketball player serves his community through sport 26 Soaring Towards Success Project SOAR gives struggling African American students a leg up on life 28 Getting a Kick out of Teaching Four competitors join forces

CONTENTS 608 Magazine is published by EJ Publishing 5201 Old Middleton Rd Madison, WI 53705 (608) 509-6704 EXECUTIVE PUBLISHER Ernest K. Jones DIRECTOR Ron Brent INTERESTED IN MORE FROM 608 Magazine? Contact us via email at 608magazine@ gmail.com or call (608) 509-6704 Owner & Publisher Ernest K. Jones

WRITERS Jennifer Niemela Wendy Hack Jennifer Niemela Dan Emerson Solomon Gustavo John Doetkott Joe Nistler

DESIGNERS Erica Winship Vanessa Bell Sam Jansen Marcus BuckNarley (Photography) Quinncy Bynum

Copyright 2016 EJ Publishing No part of this publication may be reproduced in any form or by any means without the prior written permission of the publisher, excepting brief quotations in connection with reviews written specifically for inclusions in magazines or newspapers, or limited excerpts strictly for personal use. Printed in the United States of America. All rights reserved.

Your Source for News and Information on Addiction, Recovery, and Everything In Between

Madison's fabled "Funky Drummer" Clyde Stubbleeld has been called “the world's most sampled drummer.” His accomplishments with James Brown’s history-making groove machines of the 1960s have been well chronicled – if not fairly rewarded nancially. Countless drummers from around the world have cited the importance of his inuence on R&B, funk, hip hop and rock. A few years ago, the late musical innovator Prince showed his appreciation by sending Stubbleeld a check for $90,000 to help pay for his cancer treatment. Closer to home, a number of Madison musicians also testify to Stubbleeld's lasting inuence. One of them is Clyde’s nephew, Brett Stubbleeld, who grew up watching him play and now leads his own band in Madison. At one point, when Brett was “six or seven, Uncle Clyde brought over a set of drums, taught me a couple of beats, and said, ‘Good luck.’” Later on, Brett received other useful advice from his uncle: “‘Always emphasize the groove; forget about the turnarounds. Be a team player: don't play a whole lot, let everybody else (in the band) do their thing,’” says Brett, who is the son of Clyde's late brother, Frank Stubbleeld. “Anybody who has heard Uncle Clyde knows that he brings a level of sophistication no one can really touch. It's his own groove. He adds so much different stuff, so unorthodox, but it all works.” Not surprisingly, Clyde also stressed to his nephew the importance of paying attention to the business side of music. “He said, ‘If you play, you need to get compensated.’”

UNIVERSAL DRUM INFLUENCE

“He has done artist development for hundreds of musicians who have come out of Madison.” - Joey Banks, Madison drummer and educator

ENTERTAINMENT

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HELPING UNCLE CLYDE Lately, Brett has served as a sort of “relief drummer” on his uncle's gigs. Due to health issues, Clyde can't sustain a whole gig. “So I'll jump in on the second set, play ve or six songs – or as many as he wants me to – and then he'll come back up and play.” When Madison resident Leo Sidran was six years old, his jazz vocalist-pianist father, Ben, brought home a child-sized drum kit. Then Ben called Clyde Stubbleeld. “He came over and showed me how to hold the sticks and hit the drums,” says Leo, who now tours with his father's combo.

Madison-based drummer Joey Banks says Stubbleeld’s willingness to play with regular people – rather than stars – has been important for the local scene. “He has done artist development for hundreds of musicians who have come out of Madison, letting them be in his band, coaching them. Clyde has always been very supportive of young kids who want to get onstage; he gives them that experience,” says Banks, who co-founded the local group Coalition for Recognition of Clyde Stubbleeld. “And, he’s always had some constructive criticism to help them develop. A lot of those musicians have gone on to become pretty high-level musicians in their own right, and teachers. That’s the kind of

“Clyde is a great example of how a person left to his own devices can nd his own voice and change the world.” - Michael Bland, former Prince drummer

Leo Sidran also has childhood memories of Stubbleeld playing at festivals in his East Madison neighborhood. Starting at age 13, he started accompanying his dad to Stubbleeld's weekly Funky Monday gigs. “When I was just old enough to stay up late and hang out, Clyde would let me sit in. I don’t think I ever asked him to show me specic stuff, but he was so supportive and inuential. “He did tell me to practice by hitting a pillow. Counter to what most drum teachers would tell you – to work on the bounce and release of the stick – Clyde told me to muscle it into the pillow. He’s a very physical drummer.” Leo Sidran says he has been most impressed by Stubbleeld’s “total commitment to the groove; he is not busy or ashy, he is settled deeply into his pocket.”

person he is; he is genuinely kind.” Banks, who is also a music educator, teaches a lot of “Clyde beats” to his students. “Clyde’s real gift is his left hand, the solid, pocket feel. It separates his feel from everyone else’s.” Clyde Stubbleeld never got a chance to meet Prince, although he worked on a recording project at Paisley Park in Minneapolis, back in the early ‘90s. But Prince’s long-time drummer, Michael Bland, is another player who considers Stubbleeld a major rhythmic inuence. i i i l i i l i l l i l l i i i l li l i l l l l l i l i j i l i i li i l i l i i l l i l i l l j i i “He has been such an innovator,” Bland says, pointing out that Stubbleeld is largely a “self-taught” drummer. “Clyde is a great example of how a person left to his own devices can nd his own voice and change the world.” i l i i l l i l l l l i l l i i i i l

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When Richard Davis arrived at the University of Wisconsin-Madison campus in 1977, he was a world-renowned jazz and classical bassist, but a relatively inexperienced teacher. However, by the time Davis retired recently as a UW music professor, he had achieved what teachers aspire to: having an indelible effect on many of his students. To succeed, Davis incorporated some of the traits of jazz musicians in his teaching style: knowledge, judgement, and especially the ability to improvise. “When I walk into a room, I have no idea what I’m going to talk about. Then, I sense something. I’ve never had any notes, even in the classroom.” In a recent interview, Davis recounted an experience that illustrates his improvisational, provocative approach to communicating, and teaching. A non-prot organization serving people with physical disabilities asked Davis to speak at its event. With no experience in the topic area, he was unsure what approach to take. “I asked the woman who contacted me what I should talk about? She said, ‘From what I’ve heard about you, you can do it.’ “The rst thing I said to the audience was, ‘Who in this room of 300 people considers themselves to be ugly?’ Three people raised their hands. One of them was a woman in a wheelchair; I had hoped she would raise her hand. “I take a lot of risks when I teach. I asked her if I could sit in her lap – she weighed about 200 pounds. I just sat there for 30 seconds and didn’t say a word. Then I said, ‘I was just trying to nd the ugliest spot on you.’ She started crying, and we became friends.”

“I TAKE A LOT OF RISKS WHEN I TEACH.” - Richard Davis, teacher

RETIRING UW INSTRUCTOR MADE HIS PRESENCE FELT

ENTERTAINMENT E TE TAI E T

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communities and institutions in Madison. co unities and ins itutions in Madison.

Davis says his primary goal in teaching the course has been to “make people realize how negative attitudes can wreck people’s lives – not only the recipient but the perpetrator. Racism is like a disease. A major goal is to educate the mind and heal the heart.” After 16 years, the course has had a positive impact on the campus in changing attitudes, Davis and others say. It would be difcult to gauge how much impact, although Davis notes, “My students do spread the word around campus.” Craig Werner, chairman of the UW Department of African American studies, says Davis is “a terric teacher, along with being a towering gure in the music world.” “What matters most deeply is that Richard makes a profound impact with his vision of what race, culture and life are all about. He’s an elder; our teaching world is not built around elders because we’re a youth-obsessed culture that confuses youth with vibrancy. He certainly presents an alternative take on that. Through who he is, he has a deep impact on individual students.” Now that he has retired as a music professor, Davis will have more time for composing and playing his own music. He already has several concert trips to Europe scheduled. “I go where I am needed,” says Davis, who turned 86 in April. He also plans to continue teaching the Institute classes from his home. He’s having some sweatshirts printed, bearing a quotation from the founder of the Institute, Nathan Rutstein: “Prejudice is an emotional commitment to ignorance.” Davis says his primary goal in teaching the course has b en to “ ake people realize how negative a itudes can wreck people’s lives – not only the recipient but the perpetrator. Racis is like a disease. A major goal is to educate the mind and heal the heart.” After 16 years, the course has had a positive impact on the ca pus in changing a itudes, Davis and others say. It would be difcult to gauge how much impact, although Davis notes, “ y students do spread the word around ca pus.” Craig Werner, chairman of the U Department of African A erican studies, says Davis is “a te ric teacher, along with being a towering gure in the usic world.” “ hat ma ters most d eply is that Richard makes a profound impact with his vision of what race, culture and life are all about. He’s an elder; our teaching world is not built around elders because we’re a youth-obse sed culture that confuses youth with vibrancy. He certainly presents an alternative take on that. Through who he is, he has a d ep impact on individual students.” Now that he has retired as a music profe sor, Davis will have more time for co posing and playing his own music. He already has several concert trips to Europe scheduled. “I go where I a n eded,” says Davis, who turned 86 in April. He also plans to continue teaching the Ins itute cla ses fro his ho e. He’s having so e sweatshirts printed, bearing a quotation fro the founder of the Ins itute, Nathan Rutstein: “Prejudice is an e otional co itment to ignorance.”

INFLUENCED BY A TEACHER Years ago, a masterful teacher made a difference in Davis’s own life: it was Walter H. Dyett, a longtime music teacher at DuSable High School in Chicago, who mentored a long list of soon-to-be-famous musicians and vocalists. Dyett insisted that his students learn both classical music and jazz. In 1948, when Davis started auditioning for classical orchestras as an 18-year old bassist in his native Chicago, opportunities were rarely offered to African-American classical musicians, regardless of their qualications. But, “when I got to New York, I realized there were orchestras there that I was welcome to play in” and he did, while also building his reputation as a jazz composer and player. Before UW recruited Davis to teach European classical music and bass performance, he lived in New York City and performed under the batons of some great composers and conductors, including Igor Stravinsky, George Szell, Pierre Boulez, Leopold Stokowski and Leonard Bernstein. He also played bass on landmark jazz albums by Bobby Hutcherson, Eric Dolphy, Andrew Hill, Elvin Jones and others. In the 1960s, iconic saxophonist John Coltrane tried to recruit Davis to join his band. Davis has also recorded a number of highly-regarded jazz albums as leader of his own bands. Aside from his music, Davis has made some of his most signicant impact in Madison by teaching a weekly, interactive course in his own home. The course on Healing Racism was developed by the Institute for the Healing of Racism, a nonprot social justice organization with more than 200 chapters in several counties. The mission is to raise consciousness about the history and pathology of racism and help heal racism in individuals, I FL E CE BY A TE C ER Years ago, a masterful teacher made a di ference in Davis’s own life: it was Walter H. Dye t, a longtime usic teacher at DuSable High Sch ol in Chicago, who mentored a long list of s on-to-be-fa ous usicians and vocalists. Dye t insisted that his students learn both cla sical music and ja z. In 1948, when Davis started auditioning for cla sical orchestras as an 18-year old ba sist in his native Chicago, o portunities were rarely o fered to African-A erican cla sical musicians, regardle s of their qualications. But, “when I got to New York, I realized there were orchestras there that I was welco e to play in” and he did, while also building his reputation as a ja z co poser and player. Before U recruited Davis to teach European cla sical music and ba s performance, he lived in New York City and performed under the batons of so e great co posers and conductors, including Igor Stravinsky, George Szell, Pie re Boulez, Leopold Stokowski and Leonard Bernstein. He also played ba s on land ark ja z albu s by Bo by Hutcherson, Eric Dolphy, Andrew Hill, Elvin Jones and others. In the 1960s, iconic saxophonist John Coltrane tried to recruit Davis to join his band. Davis has also recorded a nu ber of highly-regarded ja z albu s as leader of his own bands. Aside fro his music, Davis has made so e of his ost signicant impact in Madison by teaching a w ekly, interactive course in his own ho e. The course on Healing Racis was developed by the Ins itute for the Healing of Racis , a nonprot social justice organization with more than 2 0 chapters in several counties. The mi sion is to raise consciousne s about the history and pathology of racis and help heal racis in individuals,

“Richard makes a profound impact with his vision of what race, culture and life are all about.” - Craig Werner, chairman, Department of African American Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison

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“It can feel like there isn’t any genuine effort to improve the wellbeing of minorities.” -Sabrina Madison, motivational speaker and socialpreneur

the f ace of

P rogress

Motivational coach unites black community and encourages change

ENTERTAINMENT E TE TAI E T

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When Sabrina Madison shared a controversial Facebook post on her page, she didn’t expect a urry of over 300 responses that caused an online debate. “It was about the Madonna-whore complex,” Madison shares. “We were arguing about it. Then I suggested we get together and discuss it in-person.” The instance inspired Conversation Mixtape, a popular discussion group for black men and women to converse face-to-face about common or uncomfortable issues. The group is just one of the ways Madison, known as Heymiss Progress, works to improve relations in the black community. “When you live in a place with racial micro-aggression, disparity and violence, it can feel like there isn’t any genuine effort to improve the wellbeing of minorities,” Madison says. One factor is the disconnect between black citizens with each other. She’s found African-Americans who have lived in the area for decades but never met others in the community. Lacking this collaborative network can hinder professional and personal growth. Madison also hopes she can introduce new information and access to resources for blacks, especially women aspiring for positions of leadership. Many are not aware of the tools available that can assist them with career growth, nancial planning and overall wellness. Black females can be overlooked for leadership roles and inuential positions because they are disregarded by the majority community at times. Madison wants to empower women to try for these positions in order to shift the norm and create new opportunities for the demographic. “I hope my own success can motivate other black women to take a risk on themselves,” Madison says. “Black people have to be careful not to start believing the stereotypes they hear about themselves.” Fi ght i ng Misconcept i ons

“I hope my own success can motivate other black women to take a risk on themselves.” -Sabrina Madison

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ENTERTAINMENT

AN EXTRAORDINARY LIFE MEMOIR CHRONICLES JOURNEY FROM SHARECROPPING TO MAKING MADISON HISTORY

school dropout, Thomas saw the U.S. Army as an escape from his extreme poverty, and served as a rocket specialist in Germany and with the Big Red One at Fort Riley in Kansas. After leaving the Army in 1963, Thomas made his way to Madison where he attended the University of Wisconsin, earning bachelor’s and master’s degrees before going to work for the city. Thomas served as a planner in the mayor’s ofce before becoming the rst black assistant mayor in the city’s history. He would go on to open the city’s rst African-American owned art gallery, leaving a legacy in the city that he hopes will inspire others. “I hope that they get an appreciation for the kind of life that I led and where I come from, from humble beginnings,” Thomas says. “I hope they know that it’s there if they want to emulate it, they can do it.”

The road to success in America isn’t as easy for some as it is for others. While some hold the proverbial silver spoon, others are left with very little to hold on to at all. But from adverse circumstances often come extraordinary achievements. Such was the life of James C. Thomas, who chronicles his early struggles, and his eventual successes, in his recent book, “The Son of a Sharecropper Achieves the American Dream.” “People have always told me that I have an interesting story to tell,” Thomas says. “Basically, it’s a memoir about my life starting off as a kid in Mississippi working on the plantation.” Thomas was born in rural Coahoma, Mississippi, in 1941 to an 18-year-old sharecropper. He grew up on the plantation, spending his early years chopping and picking cotton for 10 hours a day, eight months out of the year. As a high

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Memoir takes form Always hungry for more education, Thomas enrolled in a creative writing class several years ago, and it was there that his memoir began to take shape. Although family members had always encouraged him to write about his life as a way of leaving a legacy for future generations, it was the support of his instructor that nally moved him to put his experiences on paper. “I wrote the beginning of the book for the class project,” Thomas says. “So that's what gave me the impetus to write it.” Thomas says the response to the memoir has been exceptional, and he’s done several signings to promote the book. He says he’s been particularly happy with the response from family members, who say they’re happy to have a personal chronology of someone so important in their lives. Now comfortably retired and living in Florida, Thomas is still active in the pain management and treatment center he opened with his family in Milwaukee. The clinic aims to provide comprehensive services particularly for people living in the inner city, and it’s that sense of purpose to help others that permeates the book. Thomas says he knows all too well the

“I want to be an encouragement to them.” - James C. Thomas, author struggles facing many people these days, and he hopes his readers will be able to draw from his experiences to nd motivation and hope in their own lives.

“I want to be an encouragement to them,” Thomas says. “You can do it too, if you want to.”

“I HOPE THAT THEY GET AN APPRECIATION FOR THE KIND OF LIFE THAT I LED AND WHERE I COME FROM, FROM HUMBLE BEGINNINGS.”

-James C. Thomas

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Release

1st Book

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LEADER OF “We’re a program of high character and we’re going to do the right thing.” - Coach Bill Kegler, head men’s basketball coach, Madison College

MORE THANAGAME Kegler’s promotion comes after serving ve years as an assistant coach under Scot Vesterdahl, who is retiring this year after leading the WolfPack for over 14 years. Kegler says he learned a lot in his time as an assistant, particularly about the collegiate basketball system and what it takes to be successful. But he also says he learned a lot from Vesterdahl in particular about how to build a program that prioritizes academics and playing the game the right way. “We’re a program of high character and we’re going to do the right thing,” Kegler says. “That's

More than a week after the announcement was made, Bill Kegler still has trouble believing it. “It’s kind of surreal, it hasn't necessarily hit me yet,” Kegler says. The announcement, that Kegler would be taking over as the new head men’s basketball coach at Madison College, represents the culmination of years of work, but also the start of a new challenge. “It’s exciting, I’m really looking forward to the opportunity that we have here,” Kegler says.

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THE PACK MADI SON COLLEGE HIRES NEW HEAD MEN’ S BASKETBALL COACH

“It can accomplish a lot and help a lot of these kids move forward with their academic and athletic “It can ac o plish a lot and help a lot of these kids move forward with their acade ic and athletic

careers,” Kegler says. LOCAL TALENT care rs,” Kegler says. L L T LE T

In searching for the next generation of players, Kegler won’t be looking too far. Kegler says he plans to recruit the local area heavily, saying youth and high school leagues have done well to develop young players in recent years. He says he sees a lot of great high school players in the Madison area alone, and will try to capitalize on that homegrown talent pool. “Wisconsin basketball has grown tremendously in the last couple decades,” Kegler says. “Recruiting kids from our area and our state is a no-brainer because the skill sets and the talent are there.” In his new role, Kegler will also be in charge of the new Goodman Sports Complex once construction is completed this fall, handling all the scheduling and trying to recruit larger events to the complex. The team will hold their rst practices at the beginning of August with nal tryouts in September, and although Kegler is still trying to gure out exactly what he has for a team, he says he likes the nucleus of returning guys and expects a successful season. While it will be up to the players to prove him right on the court, for his part, Kegler says he’s ready for the challenge. “It’s something that I really want to do, and I know I can do, and I’ll have success with because I’ll put the work in.” In searching for the next generation of players, Kegler won’t be lo king to far. Kegler says he plans to recruit the local area heavily, saying youth and high scho l eagues have done well to develop young players in recent years. He says he se s a lot of great high scho l players in the Madison area alone, and will try to capitalize on that ho egrown talent po l. “ isconsin basketball has grown tre endously in the last couple decades,” Kegler says. “Recruiting kids fro our area and our state is a no-brainer because the skill sets and the talent are there.” In his new role, Kegler will also be in charge of the new Go d an Sports Co plex once construction is co pleted this fall, handling all the scheduling and trying to recruit larger events to the co plex. The tea will hold their rst practices at the begin ing of August with nal tryouts in Septe ber, and although Kegler is still trying to gure out exactly what he has for a tea , he says he likes the nucleus of returning guys and expects a suc es ful season. hile it will be up to the players to prove him right on the court, for his part, Kegler says he’s ready for the challenge. “It’s so ething that I really want to do, and I know I can do, and I’ll have suc es with because I’ll put the work in.”

“Recruiting kids from our area and our state is a no-brainer because the skill sets and the talent are there.” - Coach Bill Kegler

going to be a staple of the program and continue.” going to be a staple of the progra and continue.”

Kegler says he makes a point to talk to his players about life skills and leadership, saying “basketball ends every day for somebody,” and players need to be ready to take that next step in life. But as someone who cherishes the game and has made a career out of it, Kegler says he wants to show his players that the game of basketball can be a stepping stone to a brighter future beyond the court. Kegler says he makes a point to talk to his players about life skills and leadership, saying “basketball ends every day for so ebody,” and players ne d to be ready to take that next step in life. But as so eone who cherishes the ga e and has made a care r out of it, Kegler says he wants to show his players that the ga e of basketball can be a step ing stone to a brighter future beyond the court.

SPORTS

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Ron Dayne

to oer advice and a little encouragement to the younger generation now wearing the red and white. “I go down and watch the boys and try to pump them up,” Dayne says. On game days, Dayne will often walk between the tents of tailgaters, mingling with alumni who he says still recognize him often. He says many will tell stories of watching him play and what those performances meant to them, with some even tearing up, a phenomenon that has left quite the impression on his children. Dayne says the way some people react, you’d think he was “Michael Jackson or something,” but he says it’s all in good fun and he enjoys sharing in those football memories.

CAMPUS Big Man on Heisman Trophy winner stays close to home following NFL career H e may not be blowing through blocks and ghting his way into the endzone anymore, but that doesn’t mean Heisman Trophy winner Ron Dayne isn’t still part of the Badger football family. While not in a formal coaching role, the former star running back still nds his way to the eld

SPORTS

“I still get recognized and it’s funny because my kids are starting to get recognized too now,” Dayne says. “‹ey’ll tell me stories and they’re great, I love it.” © Google © Google

© Google

Forever a Badger After retiring from the NFL following his seventh season in the league, Dayne returned to the Madison area to be closer to the school that has meant so much to him. He now works as an ambassador for the university, helping connect people to the school and improve community relations. A Badger for life, Dayne says he’ll “do whatever they need me to do, really.” “Whatever they call on me to do, charity events, social events, awards events, whatever it takes,” Dayne says. “It’s been fun, I can’t complain. I enjoy doing what I do.”

watching his boys play brings back both posi- tive, and some painful, memories. “I miss it a lot, but now my boys can do it. I don’t miss getting hit though,” Dayne says with a laugh. Dayne’s oldest daughter plays soccer at Michi- gan, and it’s safe to say sports will continue to ˆll a prominent place in his life. His Heisman Trophy resides in Camp Randall for now, and Dayne says it’s ˆtting as he looks to continue his football life in Madison for years to come. “‹at was my dream as a kid, and I got it,” Dayne says. “And now my dream for my kids is for them to do the best they can do.”

© Google

But he does miss his previous job as an NFL running back. While he was able to play seven seasons, his production never quite matched that of his college days, although that would have been di‚cult even for a Heisman Trophy winner. Dayne says he thinks his numbers dipped primarily because of the o„ensive systems he found himself in. “I could have been running the ball more,” Dayne says. “I just don’t think I got to be the running back for the team like I was at Wisconsin.”

A football life

But football still occupies a large portion of Dayne’s life. All of his sons play football, and he spends his time on the sidelines more often than not these days. His son Javian is a rising star at Waunakee High School, and he says

FORMER UW BASKETBALL PLAYER SERVES HIS COMMUNITY THROUGH SPORT

“I ’M DOING SOMETHING POSITIVE FOR THE COMMUNITY.” - ROY BOONE, FORMER UW BASKETBALL PLAYER

The Roy Boone Summer League started last year to ll a void until winter ball resumes, but it quickly grew into a premier showcase of local talent. Boone was able to recruit a number of former Division I and Division II college players, as well as former professional and even current NBA players (Dallas Mavericks’ Wes Matthews). “I’m friends with a lot of the guys already, so when I reach out to them, they respond back,” Boone says. “Every week I was adding new guys in.”

When it comes to providing recreational services for the Madison community, Roy Boone is practically a one-man army. Between running a summer basketball league for adults, another league for kids, coaching 5th grade boys basketball, mentoring students and working at a community center, Boone has his hands full. But he says the long hours he puts into his volunteer work are worth it because he knows he’s making Madison a better place to live. “I’m doing something positive for the community,” Boone says.

SPORTS

BASKETBALL IQ

“I try to use my resources and my Badgers connections to try to bring some of the guys back into the community where I’m at,” Boone says. Boone himself played for the Badgers before signing contracts to play professionally overseas, and he uses the game to make a positive impact on the kids he coaches. He often recruits kids to work concessions and sell tickets for the adult league to keep them involved in something positive, and he says he mentors them to teach them how to conduct themselves both on and off the court. “I’m having a blast doing that, passing down the knowledge and the experience that I learned,” Boone says.

Boone’s connections to some of the area’s best basketball players have also proved to be a major benet in his youth leagues as well. Boone says he’s recruited players like Tamara Moore (Wisconsin’s all-time leader in steals and assists) and other Badgers to help out at basketball camps, showing the younger generation what it takes to be a top talent.

“I DON’T REALLY LOOK AT IT AS WORK BECAUSE I ENJOY DOING IT.”

- ROY BOONE

example for his daughter and hopes the lessons he passes on to kids stay with them for years to come. “I think this is what I’m supposed to be doing,” Boone says. “I don’t really look at it as work because I enjoy doing it.”

POSITIVE MESSAGES

Boone says he enjoys sharing stories of his experiences with the kids and just being present in their lives. He says many of the kids lack a strong male role model in their lives and he hopes to be a positive example for them to follow. “They need to see it, they don’t need to hear it, they need to see you do it,” Boone says. “As long as they feel they can do what I did, or it’s possible they could go to college, or play basketball, that's a huge plus to me.” For all the chaos that comes with running multiple basketball leagues while juggling a young family, Boone says he loves making a difference in the community. He says he wants to be a positive

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success

A new initiative led by 100 Black Men of Madison aims to lower truancy rates and raise graduation rates among male African American middle and high schoolers in Madison. Project SOAR (Student Opportunities, Access and Readiness) launched its multifaceted approach in September to help students from economically disadvantaged families build skills in the classroom and beyond. According to 100 Black Men spokesman J.R. Sims, 70 percent of African American students in Madison come from economically disadvantaged families, which can impact a student’s academic performance, and in turn present further life challenges later on.

“Most of these kids don’t have trouble learning, they have trouble living.” - J.R. Sims, Director of Communications for 100 Black Men of Madison

“Most of these kids don’t have trouble learning, they have trouble living,” says Sims. “Their lives outside of school are so challenging.” Project SOAR utilizes a three-pronged approach with participants with an emphasis on one-on-one mentoring. The career academy will allow students to investigate post-graduation opportunities, be it employment or further education, while the success academy focuses on life and interpersonal skills to boost self image and create well-rounded, contributing members of society.

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PROJECT SOAR GIVES STRUGGLING AFRICAN AMERICAN STUDENTS A LEG UP ON LIFE

“Whatever the child is missing, we’re going to match him with a mentor that can provide that piece.” - J.R. Sims

year we want to provide the highest quality of services.” Once registered in the program, a participant is evaluated to determine his needs, and then paired with a suitable mentor who can best address those needs. “Whatever the child is missing, we’re going to match him with a mentor that can provide that piece,” he adds. With Project SOAR, 100 Black Men of Madison expects to reduce truancy rates by 7 percent in the next three years among African American students between the ages of 12 and 17, and increase graduation rates by 5 percent over the same period. SOAR has also committed 2,000 hours of community service from participants. Project SOAR is the rst program of its kind in the country in its scope and concept, according to Sims. The initiative was spearheaded by 100 Black Men of Madison, a local chapter of a national organization with a storied history of mentorship and community development. As it progresses, Sims says Project SOAR will serve as a model for future programs on the national scale under the leadership of 100 Black Men of America. “If we can help this many kids and give them someone to talk to, give them action items they can take advantage of, and allow them to see themselves in a different light,” Sims says, “it’s a win for everybody involved.” Building on a history of service

“We hope to instill a positive self image and teach them the meaning of a brand - that they themselves are their own brand,” says Sims. “We hope to make them bigger than we receive them.”

Front line referrals maximize efcacy 

Its “soft roll out” in September reinforced an emphasis on the quality of services provided to a student, rather than the quantity of students reached. Project SOAR has partnered with Madison Metropolitan School District, where professionals across the 36 district schools refer students who meet the criteria of living either in poverty, in a single-parent household, in foster care, or are involved in the juvenile justice system. “We rely on teachers and social workers because they’re on the front lines with these students,” says Sims. “When a teacher sees someone experiencing issues, they can refer them to us.” The program enrolls individuals as they are referred, gradually approaching its capacity of 40 students with direct mentors, 350 students enrolled in the success academy, and 350 to take part in the career academy. Participants may enroll in one or both of the academies. 100 Black Men has also enlisted the help of the Madison Police Department and juvenile justice system for referrals to redirect at-risk youth from a criminal path. “Our body of work will far exceed our working body,” says Sims. “This rst

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Some of the martial arts taught at Legacy Martial Arts Center in Madison originated more than 1,500 years ago, with the Shaolin monks of China. The four owner/teachers who opened Legacy in 2014 don't go back quite that far, but they do have several decades of shared history. Before becoming business partners, Grandmaster Ken Bent, Master Russ Topper and instructors Kim White and Tony Harper competed against each other in amateur martial arts tournaments, beginning in the 1970s. Back in the mid-'70s, Bent says he was a young man headed in the wrong direction, with athletic ability and a penchant for ghting. An older friend suggested he channel that energy into karate lessons and introduced him to the master instructor who helped him get started. Bent soon found he had a knack for the sport. Taught by a Korean grandmaster who instilled discipline, respect and other foundational values, Bent says his attitude quickly evolved from wanting to learn better ways to “kick butt,” to personal growth and a desire to share the knowledge and skills he had acquired. “When you're young, you think the world revolves around you. Martial arts has made me a better man, a better husband, a better father. I became more giving and helpful to other people.”

FOUR COMPET I TORS JOIN FORCES

“I’m always challenging students to set new goals; that’s how they grow.”- Grandmaster Ken Bent, co-owner, Legacy Martial Arts Studio

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“ Within weeks , they are doing things they thought they could do . ” - Kim White, co-owner, Legacy Martial Arts Studio

TOP-RANKED KARATE CHAMPION In competition, Bent won hundreds of amateur “light contact” tournaments across the Midwest, and then turned pro at the suggestion of his grandmaster. By 1981, he was ranked number one in the U.S. in full contact karate. While continuing to compete, 35 years ago Bent opened a martial arts studio to pass on his knowledge. As an instructor, he helped develop some of the top martial arts competitors in the country. He owned studios for about 25 years before retiring from teaching – temporarily, as it turned out. “People kept telling me I should go back to teaching.” Today, Bent says the satisfaction he derives from teaching dwarfs the enjoyment he experienced as a competitive champ. “Competing was a form of ego gratication, but working with kids and seeing their lives change has been way better,” Bent says, particularly teaching kids with autism or some other type of disadvantage. One of his goals when opening the school was making martial arts instruction affordable for kids from single parents and low income families; he charges a sliding scale based on family income.

“I love teaching kids; my reward is watching young people grow up in the right direction,” says Bent, who will turn 65 this year. “If they learn to set small goals at a young age, pretty soon, big goals will be no problem.” Requiring each student to learn certain techniques to continue being promoted is one way to accomplish that. “I'm always challenging students to set new goals; that's how they grow.” Earlier this year, after a Madison woman was attacked on a local bike path, Bent was inspired to begin offering free self-defense classes for women. While physical self-defense techniques are part of the course, the main focus is on preventive measures – such as being aware of one's surroundings and avoiding potentially dangerous situations. Co-owner White says the four Legacy partners share a strong competitive spirit and a desire to teach. “We put our heads together to teach and it's a wonderful thing,” says White, who started studying martial arts as a ninth grader, at one of the rst local studios. “We see some people come in who can barely walk and chew gum at the same time. We work with them, and nurture them and within weeks they are doing things they never thought they could do” – tornado kicks, ying aerial jumps and a repertoire of other exotic, self-defense moves. Along with learning to concentrate and focus energy on the task at hand, those who study martial arts also learn the valuable skill of maintaining calm in stressful situations, White notes. Studying martial arts is a lifelong pursuit and a continual growth process. “I'm 57, and I'm still learning.”

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When Michael Johnson says he owes his life to the Boys & Girls Club, he's not exaggerating. Out of the 23 people in his Chicago grade school graduating class, only three others are alive today. Johnson and those three classmates had several things in common: they were all connected to “a community of faith,” they each had mentors, and they were all members of the Boys & Girls Clubs. Johnson grew up thinking he would like to run a Boys & Girls Club someday, an ambition he achieved in 2010 when he became President and CEO of the Boys & Girls Club of Dane County.

boys & girls clubleader makespresencefelt BRIDGE

Johnson learned early about the value of the Boys and Girls Club, growing up in two Chicago housing projects. He was only seven when he and his friends started hanging out at a BGC only a block from his home, playing pool and shooting baskets. “The neighborhood was the world's murder capital at the time,” Johnson recalls. “But the club kept me off the street, kept me alive, and helped me nd a mentor. It's one of the reasons I'm here today.” Club eld trips, including one to Indiana State University, opened Johnson's eyes to the world outside the projects, and possible career paths. Johnson worked part-time for the club while in high school and as a student at Chicago's Malcolm X College, where he earned an associate degree. He

went on to earn a B.A. degree in business education at Chicago State University, as the rst member of his family to graduate from college. He later earned an MBA from the University of Phoenix. Johnson went on to hold a number of management positions with the city of Philadelphia, Lutheran Guild & Family Services of Indiana and Kentucky, the Philadelphia and Chicago public schools, and the Monsanto Family YMCA in St. Louis. DELIVERING RESULTS When organizations like the BGC hire new leaders, they hope for bigger and better results. In his six years in Madison, Johnson has delivered signicant results, other community leaders say. “When I moved here, I didn't know one person in Madison. But I've always been someone who tries to build bridges between communities and be solution-oriented.” Johnson and his colleagues have done a lot of bridge-building: BGC now has partnerships with more than 100 different organizations in the Dane County area, including two local police departments. Johnson, who was named 2012 Midwest Executive of the Year by Boys & Girls Clubs of America, developed a ve year, $15

“I’ve always been someone who tries to bridge communities and be solution-oriented.” - Michael Johnson, President and CEO, Boys and Girls Club of Dane County

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million strategic plan that has resulted in doubling the number of children and families being served in Dane County. One of the Dane County club's most successful initiatives has been the effort to increase high school graduation rates and prepare kids for higher education. Several years ago the club launched a fundraising effort with a target of $15 million to expand tutoring and mentoring programs in public schools, triple the number of kids involved in these programs and increase high school

“We still have a lot of work to do, but I’m proud of the work we have done.” - Michael Johnson

graduation rates. BUILDER most cost-effective college preparatory program in the nation.

The Dane County club's partnership with the Madison Metropolitan School District (MMSD) has produced graduation rates of over 90 percent for ve consecutive years, with more than 82 percent of district students currently enrolled in local colleges and universities. The program started in 2007 with just 28 high school kids; today, more than 1,600 students are participating, from 10 high schools in Dane County. Through partnerships with high schools in Madison and Verona, the club has supported AVID (Advancement Via Individual Determination) programs and the club's own TOPS (Teens of Promise) project. AVID is a college readiness system that includes an elective course focused on organizational strategies, study skills, critical thinking, tutorial support, and career and college awareness. TOPS, a Boys & Girls Club of Dane County program, provides tutoring, internships and a variety of college and career-related eld trips. On average, kids who participate in the program have higher GPAs, better attendance and take more rigorous courses, than non-participants, Johnson notes. A University of Vermont study found the Madison BGC program the

Earlier this year, the club announced that 98 percent of seniors in its college-prep program graduated from high school and 94 percent were in college. “We have 335 kids in college, 90 percent of them in Wisconsin schools,” he says proudly. Johnson and the student preparation program recently received some semi-national, media recognition. The Wisconsin-based Culver's fast food chain featured him in a “Culver's Heroes” TV commercial which has been seen in 37 states. Johnson has heard from a number of friends and acquaintances who viewed it. “We still have a lot of work to do, but I'm proud of the work we have done. This community has been very generous and supportive; we've been able to grow our operating budget more than 385 percent. And, we have the most diverse workforce in Dane County. When you are inclusive, you can get the resources you need and deliver for the kids and families of Dane County.” “At the end of the day, we have to move the needle for the kids.”

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NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC LIVE! Series sponsored by Exact Sciences Chasing Rivers Spinosaurus: Lost Giant of the Cretaceous Rhinos, Rickshaws & Revolutions: My Search for Truth Among Giants: A Life with Whales

Jersey Boys Community Partner: Park Bank

The Phantom of the Opera Community Partner: Rare Steakhouse Cabaret ON SALE TBA The Book of Mormon

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Manual Cinema’s Lula

Del Ray

Beautiful

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Trey Parker’s Cannibal! The Musical

Les Ballets Trockadero

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