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400 Beverly Hanks Ctr Hendersonville, NC 28792

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PREMIERHENDERSONVILLE.COM

We promise to be there for you every step of your journey to recovery

We are a small, upscale, privately held CARF accredited clinic serving Henderson County, NC and surrounding areas. Our experience enables us to offer effective and individualized psychological and medical outpatient care. We specialize in the treatment of Opioid dependance, and provide a supportive and neutral ground to individuals from all walks of life

Our focus is to help individuals heal, energize, and become aware of their inner strengths to fight addiction and relapse. We achieve this by providing a neutral safe space, listening to your concerns, and individulizing a treatment plan for your unique needs.

We promise to be there for you every step of your journey to recovery. Our goal is to help you grow from your struggles, heal from your pain, and move forward to where you want to be in your life.

(828) 595-9558 PREMIER TREATMENT SPECIALISTS

Addiction hurts...

Recovery HEALS! HELP IS AVAILABLE.

Services

we are able to help you recover motivation, perspective, and joy that you once had in your life

Medication Assisted Treatment While all of our treatment options involve medication, we consider the counseling aspect of your care to be our most significant method to help you with the dependance, and the depression, fear, and anxiety that are commonly produced by the disease. Addiction is often accompanied with uncomfortable emotions , and through counseling and treatment, we are able to help you recover motivation, perspective, and joy that you once had in your life. Many individuals can experience the symptoms associated with addiction, but to a lesser degree. When you feel that you need less frequent counseling and clinic attendance and trust that arresting your withdrawal symptoms is key to your recovery, we often suggest Bupernorphine as an option. Although you receive less counseling, we still help you overcome these symptoms and guide you through the process of healing on monthly basis. Medicaid and State programs The State of North Carolina supports our clinic by credentialing us as a medicaid services provider and the recipents of a special grant that allows us to offer care FOR FREE to qualifying personnel. Medication assisted treatment, when coupled with counseling, can be beneficial to anyone who is looking to rebuild or strengthen their connection with their family, friends, and community as a whole.

THEY ARE MORE THAN YOU THINK LIKE YOU

80 percent of the babies born to heroin-addicted mothers are born addicts. Like mommy, like baby. PREMIER TREATMENT SPECIALISTS (828) 595-9558

Finding a balance for my physical and mental health is my goal!

400 Beverly Hanks Ctr. Hendersonville, NC 28792 | (828) 595-9558

Jesse Bennett is the statewide overdose prevention coordinator for the North Carolina Harm Reduction Coalition. “It’s not that it’s lethal. It’s lethal in the dosage it’s taken. So heroin is lethal if you take enough dosage of it, any opioid is,” said Bennett. He believes the increase in deaths is due to dealers misleading users. “So what happens is, individuals don’t realize they have fentanyl mixed in with their heroin,” said Bennett. New data from the North Carolina Medical Examiner’s Office shows in 2016, 543 people died from fentanyl. In just one year the number more than doubled to 1,252. They even provide addicts with free drug paraphernalia including syringes, cookers, and fentanyl testing strips. By law, they can legally give these items out and the people who receive it will not face prosecution. “So what we’ve seen is they are able to test their drugs before they inject them,” said Bennett. “Then if it comes up positive for fentanyl then they can say ‘maybe I should just do a test shot ... maybe I should not do this at all ... maybe I should have someone here in case of an overdose’.” “If somebody could have been monitoring his use, it would have saved him the day that he was alone, “ explained Anne Sporn.

RALEIGH, N.C. (WNCN) - Newly released numbers reveal an alarming increase in North Carolinians dying from a new kind of drug. It’s easier to get your hands on than heroin and it’s proving to be much more lethal. Now, one group is using an unconventional method to stop the problem. For one North Carolina mother, she believes this method may have saved her son’s life. “There’s a hole ... that will be there forever,” said Anne Sporn about her son. Sam Sporn was a bright-eyed, happy young boy until addiction gripped his life. His mother Anne Sporn says he started smoking marijuana in high school, which led to heroin. “By the time my husband and I figured out what was going on we really were kind of in the throes of big-time heroin addiction,” Anne Sporn said. They took him to rehab in the fall of 2014 and he went back to college months later. But while at school he relapsed. “He died in the bathroom of his dorm room. It was locked. He was all alone and they had to beat down the door,” stated the mother.

Sam Sporn is just one of many people who’ve died of a heroin overdose in North Carolina.

While new numbers from the North Carolina Medical Examiner show heroin deaths decreased slightly from 2016 to 2017, a new threat is emerging. Fentanyl is now claiming more lives. According to the National Institute on Drug Abuse, it’s cheaper and easier to obtain than heroin.

PREMIER TREATMENT SPECIALISTS 400 Bevly Hanks C Hendsville, NC 28792 (828) 595-9558

The number of drug overdose deaths in North Carolina jumped by more than 22 percent in the past year, according to the Centers for Disease Control. North Carolina saw the second-highest spike in the country after Nebraska.

Greenblatt said a trend toward cutting heroin with strong synthetic opioids—such as fentanyl—are making street drugs more dangerous. He said to cut down on deaths, North Carolina needs to strengthen comprehensive addiction treatment programs and make them widely available for long-term use. Dr. Anuradha Rao-Patel is a medical director at Blue Cross and Blue Shield of North Carolina. She urges patience and perspective and points out that the opioid crisis didn’t happen overnight. It was facilitated by the addictive nature of the drug, marketing, high prescribing rates and the imprecision of pain scales. “It’s been a long time coming and I think it’s going to take some time before we start seeing a shift,” Rao-Patel said. “With continued education, prescribers understanding they there are alternatives and being very judicious about what they’re prescribing, I think that in time, we can turn the tide.” To curb new addictions, Blue Cross and Blue Shield sharply restricted first-time opioid prescriptions in April and urged doctors to recommend alternatives for pain management. Rao- Patel said Blue Cross has already seen the number of opioid doses prescribed cut by one-quarter. Greenblatt said drugs like buprenorphine are effective for blocking the effects of opioids and treating opioid use disorder, but that many health professionals don’t bother treating people for their addictions because the believe patients are unlikely to access long-term care. Greenblatt said that needs to change. “We should think about people that have addiction as, they’re going to need long-term treatment,” he said. “That’s a lot of manpower to provide all those services, you know?” Greenblatt said expanding medicaid payment for buprenorphine and other support services for vulnerable populations could save many lives.

“I was a bit surprised to see that our prescription opioid deaths—after a number of years trending downwards— have been heading back up,” said Dr. Lawrence Greenblatt, lead physician at the Duke Health Opioid Safety Initiative. “And there’s been a lot of efforts in our state around reducing opioid overdose deaths, both prescription and illicit drugs, and it seems like we’re losing on all fronts. And that was kind of disheartening.”

Addiction There is a way out

400 Beverly Hanks Ctr Hendersonville, NC 28792 (828) 595-9558

SAMHSA PUBLISHES BEST PRACTICES ON MEDICATION-ASSISTED TREATMENT FOR OPIOID USE DISORDER Best Practices

Treatment Improvement Protocol 63, “Medications for Opioid Use Disorder, ” reviews the use of methadone, naltrexone, and buprenorphine, the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorders.

Data indicate that OUD-treating medications are both cost effective and cost beneficial

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration has published new guidance to help health care professionals better understand medications that can be used to treat Americans with opioid use disorder (OUD). Treatment Improvement Protocol (TIP) 63, “Medications for Opioid Use Disorder, ” reviews the use of methadone, naltrexone, and buprenorphine, the three FDA-approved medications to treat opioid use disorders. TIP 63 provides guidance for health care professionals and addiction treatment providers on how to appropriately prescribe these medications and effectively support patients using these medications for OUD treatment. “We know that people can and do recover from opioid use disorders when they receive appropriate treatment, and medication-assisted treatment’s success in treating opioid use disorders is well documented, ” said Dr. Elinore F. McCance-Katz, assistant secretary for Mental Health and Substance Use. “TIP 63 emphasizes that increasing access to medications to treat opioid use disorder will help more people recover, enabling them to improve their health, living full and productive lives.” TIP 63 is part of SAMHSA’s larger response to the opioid crisis. More access to treatment with OUD medications is critical to closing the gap between treatment need and treatment availability and an important public health strategy. Data indicate that OUD-treating medications are both cost effective and cost beneficial.

BREAK EVERY CHAIN PREMIER TREATME T SPECIALISTS

ADDICTION TIME WELL. RECOVERY is real, so is It’s to get

We believe in treating people as a whole and look at all aspects of their health while striving to support our patients in an integrative way that considers mental, physical and spiritual health together as one.

(828) 595-9558

One of the most significant, relatively new tools to help people recover from drug and alcohol addiction is peer support specialists, an idea that originated in the mental health field but has been adopted by the addiction recovery community.

The role peer support specialists play is somewhat similar to that of 12-step group sponsors, with some differences. The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMSHA) defines PSS as specialized assistance that is delivered by a person in recovery from a serious mental illnesses, substance use, or co-occurring mental and substance use condition, before, during, and after treatment, to facilitate a recipient’s long-term recovery in the community Adults receiving addiction treatment who also participated in peer support groups reported that the peer support helped them develop behaviors that increased the likelihood of long-term recovery. These behaviors included reductions in substance use, improved treatment engagement, reduced craving, and increased self-efficacy. Further, those who received peer support also reported reduced HIV/HCV risk behaviors. Medicaid is the main payer for peer support services, although many state departments of behavioral health offer grant funding for these services. Currently, 39 state Medicaid programs cover peer support services for either individuals with mental illness, individuals with addiction disorders, or both groups, according to the website OpenMinds.com. But few states are using their Medicaid programs to fund peer services for addiction recovery, at least not through Medicaid. Back in 2007, the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid services encouraged states to start funding peer support as a part of both mental health services and substance abuse treatment. While more than 30 states have started paying for mental health peers, only a handful pay for peers to help with addiction recovery.

If a state Medicaid program covers peer support under the fee-for-service benefit, the health plans providing coverage in that state are also required to cover those services. Some states have special provisions that allow them to only cover peer supports for limited groups of individuals, such as those enrolled in managed care. Some states also allow peer support specialists to act as qualified health care professionals for certain types of behavioral health services, but do not allow for the specific reimbursement of peer support services. According to Open Minds.com, a comparison of Medicaid fee-for-service reimbursement rates for selected states found a wide variation in reimbursement. Group rates for a 15-minute period ranged from less than $2.00, to over $5.00 and individual rates ranged from $6.50 to $24.36 per 15 minutes. Comparatively, average peer specialist compensation was $15.42 in 2015 (see National Survey of Compensation Among Peer Support Specialists). According to the International Association of Peer Supporters, the peer support specialist workforce has been growing and expanding since Medicaid established funding for these services in 2007. A majority of states have developed training and certification standards, and research has continued to expand and support the evidence base for these services. One of the traits that makes peer support specialists different from sponsors is that

they are trained, certified and paid professionals.

THERE IS LIFE AFTER ADDICTION

PREMIER TREATMENT SPECIALISTS 400 Beverly Hanks Ctr

Hendersonville, NC 28792 (828) 595-9558

not just a bad habit It’s NOT JUSTA BAD HABIT

Recent research and dialogue in the political sphere have brought long-simmering questions about addiction to the forefront: Is addiction truly a disease? Do addicts deserve to be treated like people who have a Recent res arch and ialogue in the political spher have brought long-sim ering questions about ad iction to the fore: Is addiction truly a disease? Do addicts deserve to b tr ated like people who hav a dise s that’s outside their control? disease that’s outside their control? While most researchers agree with the so-called disease model of addiction, stereotypes and cultural bias continue to stigmatize those with addiction because they made an initial choice to consume substances. However, Columbia University researchers point out that “choice does not determine whether 34 While most res archers agre with the so-called isease model of ad iction, ster otypes and cultural bias continue to stigmatize those with ad iction because they made an initial choice to consume substances. However, Columbia University res archers point out that “choice does not det rmine whether

something is a disease. Heart disease, diabetes and some forms of cancer involve personal choices like diet, exercise, sun exposure, etc. A disease is what happens in the body as a result of those choices.” Experts say that applying the distinction of choice to addiction creates biases that justify inadequate treatment. It begs the question New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie asked during a 2015 town hall meeting in New Hampshire. When Christie’s mother was diagnosed something is a disease. Heart disease, diabet s and some forms of cancer involve personal choices like diet, exercise, sun exposure, etc. A disease is what hap ens in the body as a result of those choices.” Experts ay that ap lying the distinction of choice to ad iction creates biases that justify inadequate treatment. It begs the question New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie asked uring a 2015 town hall me ting in New Hampshire. When Christie’s mother was diagnosed with lung cancer at 71 as a result of addiction to tobacco, he noted that with lung cancer at 71 as a result of ad iction to tobacco, he noted that

no one suggested that she should not be treated because she was “getting what she deserved,” he said. “Yet somehow, if it’s heroin or cocaine or alcohol, we say, ‘Ahh, they decided that, they’re getting what they deserve,’” Christie remarked. HOW ADDICTION WORKS After satisfying basic human needs like food, water, sleep and safety, people feel pleasure. That pleasure is brought by chemical releases in the brain. This is according to Columbia researchers, who note that the disease of addiction causes the brain to release high levels of those pleasure chemicals. Over time, brain functions of reward, motivation and memory are altered. After these brain systems are compromised, those with addiction can experience intense cravings for substance use, even in the face of harmful consequences. These changes can stay in the brain long after substance use desists. The changes may leave those struggling with addiction to be vulnerable to “physical and environmental cues they associate with substance use, also known as triggers, which can increase their risk of relapse,” write Columbia researchers.

not just a bad habit treatment and continued monitoring and support or recovery.

THE COLUMBIA RESEARCHERS DO HAVE SOME GOOD NEWS: Even the most severe, chronic form of the disorder can be manageable and reversible, usually with long term

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