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MAKING THE RIGHT TREATMENT CHOICE

While our facilities offer only outpatient treatment, this may not be right for everyone. Addiction treatment programs generally fall into one of two categories — inpatient or outpatient. While equally focused on treatment and rehabilitation, each type has unique attributes and benets to offer. It’s important that both the addicted person and their loved ones understand the differences before selecting a treatment program. Finding the right treatment program is the rst step in putting you or a loved one on the road to recovery. Inpatient treatment facilities are intensive and

restrictive residential treatment programs that enable the patient to completely focus on their recovery without the distractions of everyday life. Outpatient treatment centers are part-time programs, allowing the patient to continue to work or go to school. The patient must be compliant with the parameters of the program and responsible enough to keep all of their medical treatment and counseling appointments.

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IT’STIME TOTAKE YOURLIFE BACK

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11885 Holly Lane | Waldorf, MD 20601

NALOXONE T H E B A R R I E R S T O

OVERDOSE RESPONSE PROGRAM The Department of Health & Mental Hygiene

The DHMH authorizes private or public entities to conduct educational training programs using a core curriculum that includes information about prescription and non-pharmaceutical opioids and training on how to recognize and respond to an opioid overdose, proper rescue breathing technique, and how to properly administer naloxone and care for the individual until emergency medical help arrives. The training also stresses the importance of calling 911 for the person in distress and reporting the naloxone administration event to the Maryland Poison Center.

(DHMH) launched Maryland’s Overdose Response Program (ORP) in March 2014 to train and certify qualified individuals most able to assist someone at risk of dying from an opioid overdose when emergency medical services are not immediately available. Despite stringent guidelines, dispersion protocols, and the training certification required with the program, looming controversy surrounds questions of what validates individuals are being “qualified” in assisting in the Overdose Response Program. Recently, reports have shown that family members, friends and associates of opioid users; treatment program and transitional housing staff; and law enforcement officers seem to make up the majority of those most able to assist someone at risk of dying from an opioid overdose. Successfully trained individuals will receive a certificate allowing them to obtain and have filled a prescription for Naloxone, also known as Narcan®, a life-saving medication that can quickly restore the breathing of a person who has overdosed on heroin or prescription opioid pain medication like oxycodone, hydrocodone, morphine, fentanyl or methadone.

WHAT IS NALOXONE?

Naloxone is an opioid antagonist that can safely and effectively reverse an opioid-related overdose by quickly restoring breathing and consciousness. Naloxone binds to opioid receptors in the brain, displacing the opioids and temporarily reversing their life-threatening effects. Because naloxone does not affect someone without opioids in their system, it can only reverse overdoses involving opioids like prescription pain medication and heroin. Naloxone is administered intravenously and can be administered one of two ways. One, it can be injected intramuscularly or two, sprayed intranasally. Regardless of how it’s administered, both methods can be easily done by trained laypersons. Naloxone is often dispensed in a rescue kit that includes the delivery device (needle or nasal atomizer and syringe) and items such as alcohol swabs, non-latex gloves, a plastic face shield for rescue breathing and information cards on things such as opioid overdose response and naloxone administration, overdose prevention tips and substance use disorder treatment.

ADDICTION TREATMENT AND REHABILATATION

ADDICTION TREATMENT AND REHABILATATION

Regain control of your life and end the mental and physical toll this disease has brought upon you and the heartache and suffering it has caused your loved ones. Let us help you break the chains of your addiction. Our team of caring physicians will help you overcome your addiction with minimal withdrawal discomfort and low stress. In addition you will have access to addiction therapists who will help you break the circle of addiction and stay on the path to live a drug free life.

Regain control of your life and end the mental and physical toll this disease has brought upon you and the heartache and suffering it has caused your loved ones. Let us help you break the chains of your addiction. Our team of caring physicians will help you overcome your addiction with minimal withdrawal discomfort and low stress. In addition you will have access to addiction therapists who will help you break the circle of addiction and stay on the path to live a drug free life.

HELP IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY (703) 361-4357

(877) 241-3596

HELP IS JUST A PHONE CALL AWAY: 703-361-4357 877-241-3596

11885 Holly Lane | Waldorf, MD 20601

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POWER OF ATTRACTION

Recent research indicates that magnetic stimulation to the brain may work to curb addictive tendencies in humans, according to research covered in a recent Smithsonian.com article. Researchers tested transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in humans in an attempt to curb cocaine addiction. The treatment used magnets on cocaine addicts for ve consecutive days, followed by once-a-week treatments for three weeks. The number of participants was only 29, but the ndings were still encouraging: Of the 13 people who received an all-TMS protocol, 10 exhibited what researchers determined to be substantial improvement in controlling cocaine cravings. “I have met with these patients, I have seen them, I have seen their families,” says Antonello Bonci, a neuropsychopharmacologist and National Institute on Drugs researcher who co-authored the study, to Smithsonian.com. “They are alive, they are well . . . something has clearly happened to these people.” Researchers Think Magnets Can Help With Drug Addiction Impulses

Magnetic Stimulation

The Mayo Clinic denes TMS as “a noninvasive procedure that uses magnetic elds to stimulate nerve cells in the brain to improve symptoms of depression. TMS is typically used when other depression treatment hasn’t been effective.” It works through an electromagnetic coil that is placed directly on a person’s head, near the forehead. The electromagnetic simulation painlessly delivers a magnetic pulse that stimulates nerves in the PFC—the part of the brain also involved with mood control and depression, as well as addiction. “We know that addictive drugs change many, many brain regions, as many as 90 or more, and these regions are organized into overlapping circuits. We have no idea how, given this enormous complexity, just shutting down or tuning up one single region can produce such profound effects,” Bonci says, adding that drug addicts “are often unable to switch from a counterproductive behavior to another, more benecial, one. They get stuck in repetitive, compulsive behaviors, such as using drugs.” Bonci tells Smithsonian.com that he is currently in the process of launching a larger, placebo-controlled, double-blind study of cocaine addicts. “This is a pilot study—we have a lot of work to do,” says Bonci. “I think that we will know, in just a few years, if this will become an accepted treatment.”

Many Uses For TMS

Researchers are looking into the potential of TMS as an effective treatment for a number of ailments. The National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI) researchers have studied how TMS can be used for obsessive-compulsive disorder, Parkinson’s disease, and epilepsy. The Journal of Headache and Pain published work studying the effects of TMS researchers studying TMS treatment for alcohol craving suppression and addictive behaviors. NCBI also published a study on TMS and binge eating disorder and comorbid depression, and The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry published a story on the effects of high-frequency repetitive TMS stimulation for decreasing cigarette smoking. Research on the effects of TMS aims to not only explore better ways to treat illness, but also to better understand TMS. “Though the biology of why TMS works isn't completely understood, the stimulation appears to affect how this part of the brain is working,” writes Mayo Clinic Staff in their overview of TMS. One of the primary reasons for pursuing TMS as a treatment alternative is that, unlike other medications, it doesn't have signicant side-effects. “TMS is well-tolerated and associated with few side-effects and only a small percentage of patients discontinue treatment because of these,” write Johns Hopkins Medicine Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences researchers. treatment on migraines. The journals of Neuroscience Letters and Neuroscience & Biobehavioral Reviews published work by

“We know that addictive drugs change many, many brain regions, as many as 90 or more, and these regions are organized into overlapping circuits. We have no idea how, given this enormous complexity, just shutting down or tuning up one single region can produce such profound effects.”

— Antonello Bonci Neuropsychopharmacologist Director of National Institute on Drug Abuse’s Intramural Research Program

Leave your

OPIATE + OPIOID ADDICITON What is the difference between Opiates and Opioids?

addiction

behind

OPIATES

OPIOIDS

A Natural Pain RemedIES

SYNTHETIC PAIN MEDICATIONS

VS.

Opium

Oxycodone

Thebaine

Hydrocodone

Morphine

Oxymorphone

Codeine

Hydromorphone

Heroin

11885 Holly Lane Waldorf, MD 20601 (877) 241 3596 addictionhelpmd.com

What Medications Treat Opiate & Opioid Addiction?

Naltrexone

These medications act directly upon the opioid receptors; more specically the mu receptors. Because the effects of these medications vary at the receptor level, there can be different clinical effects during treatment.

ReVia | Depade | Vivitrol

Methadone Dolophine

Buprenorphine Suboxone | Subutex

A FULL AGONIST binds to the receptor and activates it by changing its shape - inducing a full receptor response.

A PARTIAL AGONIST binds to the receptor and activates it with a smaller shape change in the receptor that includes a partial receptor response.

InApril of 2015,Maryland’sHeroin& OpioidEmergencyTaskForceheldaCentral MarylandRegional SummitwhereTask Forcemembersmet inpreparation for the InterimReport inAugust. Dr.LeanaWen, HealthCommissioner forBaltimoreCity, Chair forBehavioral SystemsBaltimore,and ERPhysicianproposed the following recommendations.... 1.Decreasebarriers toNaloxone –Governor should signbills passedallowing immunity and standingorders. 2. Improvedaccess in jails: start treatment as soonas addict gets in jail (ODis the endof the line). 3.UseHot-Spotting (GeospatialMapping) to look for trends inODdeathdata:almost all patientswhodiedof overdosehavebeen through jail system.

MARYLAND’S HEROIN & OPIOID EMERGENCY TASK FORCE In August of 2015,Maryland’s Lieutenant Governor Boyd K.Rutherford issued the 2015 Heroin &Opioid EmergencyTask Force InterimReport toMaryland’s current Governor,Larry Hogan. „e InterimReport highlighted state and regional-based statistics, clinical research,workgroup updates from the Heroin &OpioidTask Force, and included 10 outlined proposals/recommendations to the state agency, an additional 10 updated state-funding announcements, 7 allocations from the Department of Health & Mental Hygiene, and 3 grant proposals for the Governor’s OŒce of Crime,Control, and Prevention to support law enforcement e’orts. „e Final Report fromMaryland’s Heroin&OpioidEmergencyTaskForce is set for December 1, 2015.

What isNaloxoneHydrochloride? Naloxone is an Opioid Antagonist. It is prescribed for reversal of respiratory depression and other opioid e’ects in patients receiving opioid analgesics and in patients who have abused heroin, morphine, or other synthetic opioids.

Dr.LeanaWen Health Commissioner -Baltimore City Chair for Behavioral Systems Baltimore

BoydK.Rutherford Lieutenant Governor of Maryland

" ere aremore people every year here inBaltimoreCitywho die fromdrug andalcohol overdoses thandie from homicide. erewere 303people last yearwho died fromdrug andalcohol overdose.Andwhatwe're teaching is that there's onemedication callednaloxone that can literally save someone's life,"

Addiction help 11885 Hly Lane Waldf, MD 20601 (877) 241 3596 www.addictihelpmd.c

I recently returned to Buffalo after living five years in Maryland where, in the first nine months of 2017, overdose deaths related to heroin, fentanyl and other opioids reached a new high of 1,501. In response to a mandate from Gov. Larry Hogan, my colleagues and I developed an opioid awareness program for all newly admitted students at Johns Hopkins University. The recent move by the Town of Tonawanda to equip its police officers with naloxone moves that department from being aware to taking action to save lives. Amid the nation’s opioid crisis, why are communities slow to adopt the lifesaving antidote naloxone? On April 5, U.S. Surgeon General Dr. Jerome Adams issued an advisory recommending that more Americans carry naloxone – not just emergency responders and law enforcement personnel, but average citizens. Recent reports from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention suggest that more than half of opioid overdose deaths are caused by synthetic drugs, including fentanyl. While heroin overdoses evolve in minutes to hours, fentanyl is faster acting and more potent, evidenced by that overdose evolving in seconds to minutes. In his study, “Characteristics of fentanyl overdoses – Massachusetts, 2014-2016,” Dr. Alexander Walley reported that among people who witnessed naloxone being administered, 83 percent said that two or more naloxone doses were used before the person responded. Of those who died from fentanyl overdoses, 90 percent had no pulse by the time emergency medical services arrived. [in Maryland] overdose deaths related to heroin, fentanyl and other opioids reached a new high of 1,501

YOUR RELATIONSHIP

While in REBUILDING

from Recovery

Addiction

11885 Holly Lane • Waldorf, MD 20601 | PH: (877) 241 3596

w “This is for those medications that are sitting in your home that are no longer needed,” Davis said. “So maybe a patient had a broken leg and needed opioids for the pain, but has some pills left over — those drugs can be easily diverted for abuse by anyone who has access, and we want to help prevent that.” In addition to the medication disposal effort, the CVS Health Foundation is helping to fund opioid-related efforts at the local level, by awarding up to $2 million in grants to community health centers dedicated to supporting opioid addiction recovery. In Baltimore, a $85,000 grant is going to Total Health Care. The funding will be used to develop and implement care models to increase participation in Total Health Care’s substance abuse treatment program. Davis said taking part in combating the opioid crisis is in line with CVS’s mission as a health care company. “Our pharmacists are uniquely positioned as part of the local health care systems to play an important role in educating and also intervening on this issue,” Davis said. “Our mission is about helping people on their path to better health, and one of the ways we can do that is through heightened safety around prominent public health issues.” Maryland is among states across the U.S. that have been ravaged by the deadly ongoing opioid epidemic. Tom Davis, vice president of professional services for CVS Health (NYSE: CVS), said CVS is seeking to support communities that have been affected by the crisis with its medication disposal kiosks. The units will allow patients to drop off unused or excess pills from old prescriptions, so they can be handed over to police and safely disposed of.

CVS looks to prevent

prescription opioid misuse with disposal kiosks in Md.

By Morgan Eichensehr – Reporter, Baltimore Business Journal Jul 12, 2018, 7:00am CVS Health has installed safe medication disposal units in 19 of its pharmacies across Maryland, in an effort to help prevent opioid abuse and misuse.

THERE IS LIFE AFTER ADDICTION

11885 Holly Lane Waldorf, MD 20601 (877) 241 3596

It’s Time To Take Your Life back

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11885 Holly Lane | Waldorf, MD 20601

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