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COPINGWITH A LARGELY IGNORED FACTOR DISCRIMINATION

& how we treat it

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2425 S. Volusia Ave. Suite B2 • Orange City, Florida • 32763 5

By Heather Hateld | WebMD Feature | Reviewed by Charlotte E. Grayson Mathis, MD EMOTIONAL EATING EATI ATIN

ere are several dierences between emotional hunger and physical hunger, according to the University of Texas Counseling and Mental Health Center web site: 1. Emotional hunger comes on suddenly; physical hunger occurs gradually. 2. When you are eating to ll a void that isn’t related to an empty stomach, you crave a specic food, such as pizza or ice cream, and only that food will meet your need. When you eat because you are actually hungry, you’re open to options. 3. Emotional hunger feels like it needs to be satised instantly with the food you crave; physical hunger can wait. 4. Even when you are full, if you’re eating to satisfy an emotional need, you’re more likely to keep eating. When you’re eating because you’re hungry, you’re more likely to stop when you’re full. 5. Emotional eating can leave behind feelings of guilt; eating when you are physically hungry does not.

Are You an Emotional Eater?

You are an emotional eaters if you answer yes to any of the following questions: Do you ever eat without realizing you’re even doing it? Do you often feel guilty or ashamed after eating? Do you often eat alone or at odd locations, such as parked in your car outside your own house? After an unpleasant experience, such as an argument, do you eat even if you aren’t feeling hungry? Do you crave specic foods when you’re upset, such as always desiring chocolate when you feel depressed? Do you feel the urge to eat in response to outside cues like seeing food advertised on television? Do you eat because you feel there’s nothing else to do? Does eating make you feel better when you’re down or less focused on problems when you’re worried about something? If you eat unusually large quantities of food or you regularly eat until you feel uncomfortable to the point of nausea, you have a problem with binge eating. Please speak to your health care professional.

COMFORT FOODS When emotional hunger rumbles, one of its distinguishing characteristics is that you’re focused on a particular food, which is likely a comfort food. “Comfort foods are foods a person eats to obtain or maintain a feeling,” says Brian Wansink, PhD, director of the Food and Brand Lab at the University of Illinois. “Comfort foods are often wrongly associated with negative moods, and indeed, people often consume them when they’re down or depressed, but interestingly enough, comfort foods are also consumed to maintain good moods.” Ice cream is rst on the comfort food list. After ice cream, comfort foods break down by sex: For women it’s chocolate and cookies; for men it’s pizza, steak, and casserole, explains Wansink. And what you reach for when eating to satisfy an emotion depends on the emotion. According to an article by Wansink, published in the July 2000 American Demographics, “e types of comfort foods a person is drawn toward varies depending on their mood. People in happy moods tended to prefer … foods such as pizza or steak (32%). Sad people reached for ice cream and cookies 39% of the time, and 36% of bored people opened up a bag of potato chips.”

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By Jennifer R. Scott | Updated February 15, 2014 Emotional eating can be a di£cult challenge when you are trying to lose weight. It’s a di£cult habit to break once it’s a part of your life, but by understanding what causes it and nding ways to cope that don’t involve food, you can overcome it. Read on to learn how to prevent and Prevent and Cope with Emotional Eating Before you can learn to cope with emotional eating, you must rst understand what it is. As the name implies, emotional eating is characterized by repeatedly eating in response to feelings rather in response to hunger to gain physical nourishment. Emotional eaters often consume large amounts of food at one sitting, which is sometimes referred to as a binge. Understand the Emotional Cues Many emotional eaters eat in response to ve common cues, which include boredom, loss of control and anger. Only you can know if these cues prompt you to eat emotionally: Eating a snack a few times a week because you are bored may not be a problem; eating a container of ice cream each time you’re angry probably is. Understanding these cues and learning how to choose another response — such as exercising to release pent-up anger —will help you end the cycle of eating in response to these feelings. Identify Your Triggers While many emotional eaters share cues in common, there may be certain feelings or situations that trigger you to eat that do not aect someone else. One of the best ways to understand your own personal emotional eating triggers is to keep a “food and feelings” food diary. In it, you simply record what you eat and how you were feeling before, during and after your binge. Stress Aects Your Eating Habits Stress is one of the most common reasons that women in particular overeat. Stress is alleviated by eating certain foods and many women get in the habit of reducing tension by enjoying these foods rather than dealing with the source of their tension. By creating self-care skills that allow you to identify non-food solutions to tension-causing situations, you will be much less likely to cope with emotional eating. What is Emotional Eating?

(Please note: Extreme feelings of hopelessness are typical of chronic depression. Please talk to a mental health professional if you nd yourself feeling perpetually hopeless.) Lack of Control You think: My life is out of control.ere is nothing in it that I am in charge of. Everyone and everything around me rules my life. Except for eating…I can eat whatever I want, whenever I want it. So I will. Feeling Unappreciated Perhaps you’ve accomplished something exceptional at work and no one has noticed. Or maybe you’ve made a personal achievement you’d dreamed of for years. But no one at home shares your pride. You nd yourself tempted to congratulate yourself by “treating” yourself to a binge. Boredom ere’s nothing to do. Nowhere to go. Perhaps you feel lonely, too.ere’s nothing at home to occupy your mind or your hours. But there is a pantry full of comfort food that will kill some of that empty time. If you t into any one of these ve proles, try sitting down with a piece of paper and brainstorming to nd alternative behaviors to eating. You may be surprised at the solutions you come up with…and at just how well they work once you try them. en, write your ideas on notecards and post them where you will see them in your moment of need — how about on the refrigerator door or next to the pantry? Accepting why you eat the way you do can be a big step towards breaking the cycle of emotional eating.

eat emotionally after a stressful day. Let Go of All or Nothinginking

All or nothing thinking means you feel like you must do something perfectly or you should not do it at all. We often are either “on” our diets or “o ” of them.e sense of failure this brings can cause negative emotions that in turn trigger a binge. By allowing yourself the freedom to face every day as a fresh start and see every decision as independent of the one before it, you may nd emotional eating is much easier to avoid.

5 Common Emotional Eating Cues

By Jennifer R. Scott | Updated February 15, 2014

Emotional eating is the practice of consuming large quantities of food — usually “comfort” or junk foods — in response to feelings instead of hunger. Some of the common emotional eating cues are: Anger Whether you’re angry at yourself, another person or a situation, you stiªe your feelings using food rather than confronting them and releasing them. It’s easier to smother a problem than to

deal with it. Hopelessness

You think: Nothing really matters anyway. Nothings ever going to change or get better for me. So, why should I care about my health or weight? Besides, eating makes me feel better.

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Therapy What is EMDR therapy and how does it work?

EMDR is the acronym for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. It was created by Francine Shapiro in 1987 and is now recommended by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs, the American Psychiatric Association, and most recently World Health Organization as very effective and efficient at helping people process traumatic events. Here is a list of typical problems that people seek EMDR therapy for: • Childhood or Adult Abuse • Extreme Illness or Grief • Post Traumatic Stress Disorder • Anger • Car Accidents • Sexual Traumas • Assault Trauma • Emotional Pain, Emotional Outbursts • Relationship problems • Phobias (including social ones) • Low Self-Confidence or Self Image • Sadness, Depression & Anxiety • Sleep Problems

EMDR is the acronym for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing.

• Intrusive thoughts, flashbacks • Being “on guard” all the time • Being Jumpy or Irritable • Substance abuse • Numbed Emotions

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Fortunately not everyone has experienced extreme neglect or trauma, however, we have all experienced being humiliated, feeling rejected, unimportant, having our emotions hurt one way or another and all of these incidences are what we call “little t-trauma” that “help” reinforce the negative beliefs we have created in our minds usually from childhood experiences.These negative beliefs (negative cognitions as we call them in EMDR) lead to automatic responses every time we get “triggered” and we react in ways that is not authentic to who we are now or how we WANT to respond.

These negative beliefs (negative cognitions as we call them in EMDR) lead to automatic responses every time we get “triggered” and we react in ways that is not authentic to who we are now or how we WANT to respond.

When we do EMDR we use bilateral stimulation, which could be eye- movements from side to side, wearing headphones that produce a tone going from one ear to the other, or holding small paddles in your hands that vibrate slightly and produce bilateral stimulation kinetically.There is a specific 8 step protocol that the EMDR trained therapist guides you through which “untangles” the memory and finally allows your brain to store it properly so that it no longer creates those knee-jerk reactions from you that do not serve you well. If you are feeling “stuck” and unable to move beyond the things that are holding you back, call me at (386) 492-0778 and let us discuss how we can get you where you want to be.

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Boom, Bust, and Drugs Study says economic downturn leads to increase in substance use disorders When the economy tanks, drug abuse goes up.That’s the finding of a new study which shows the state of the economy is closely linked with substance abuse disorder rates for a variety of substances. The study, conducted by researchers from Vanderbilt University, the University of Colorado and the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), found the use of substances like ecstasy becomes more prevalent during economic downturns. Researchers also found that other drugs like LSD and PCP see increased use only when the economy is strong. But for overall substance use disorders, the findings were clear.

“Problematic use (i.e., substance use disorder) goes up significantly when the economy weakens,” says Christopher Carpenter, one of the lead researchers. “Our results are more limited in telling us why this happens.” Researchers say it’s possible that people turn to substance use as a means of coping with a job loss or other major life changes caused by economic pressures, but their particular study did not pinpoint an exact cause and effect. Not all drugs are equal The study showed that a downward shift in the economy has the biggest impact on painkillers and hallucinogens. Rates of substance abuse disorders were significantly higher for those two categories than any other class of drug.

Researchers also found the change in disorder rates was highest for white adult males, a group which was one of the hardest hit during the Great Recession.They say more research is needed to determine exactly how the economy and drug use are related, but they say the study highlighted some key groups for prevention and treatment workers to target during future economic downturns.

“Problematic use (i.e., substance use disorder) goes up significantly when the economy weakens.” - Christopher Carpenter, Vanderbilt University

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Slippery slope Despite some lingering questions, researchers were able to show the significance of the economy’s role in problematic substance use.The study showed that even a small change in the unemployment rate can have a tremendous impact on the risks for substance abuse disorders. “For each percentage point increase in the state unemployment rate, these estimates represent about a 6 percent increase in the likelihood of having a disorder involving analgesics and an 11 percent increase in the likelihood of having a disorder involving hallucinogens,” the authors write. Previous studies have focused on the economy’s link to marijuana and alcohol, with many looking at young people in particular.This study is one of the first to highlight illicit drugs, which given the current opioid epidemic, holds important lessons for those working to curb problematic drug use.

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When it’s needed most The study bears significant weight for treatment facilities and public policy makers in particular. During economic downturns, government agencies typically look to cut spending on treatment programs as a way to save money, something researchers say may be more costly in the end. “Our results suggest that this is unwise,” Carpenter says. “Such spending would likely be particularly effective during downturns since rates of substance use disorders are increasing when unemployment rates rise, at least for disorders involving prescription painkillers and hallucinogens.”

“Spending would likely be particularly effective during downturns since rates of substance use disorders are increasing when unemployment rates rise.”

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Emotional Eating: How to Tell the Difference

There are several differences between emotional hunger and physical hunger, according to the University of Texas Counseling and Mental Health Center web site:

Emotional hunger comes on suddenly; physical hunger occurs gradually.

For more information please contact us at 386-492-0778

When you are eating to fill a void that isn’t related to an empty stomach, you crave a specific food, such as pizza or ice cream, and only that food will meet your need. When you eat because you are actually hungry, you’re open to options.

Emotional hunger feels like it needs to be satisfied instantly with the food you crave; physical hunger can wait.

Even when you are full, if you’re eating to satisfy an emotional need, you’re more likely to keep eating. When you’re eating because you’re hungry, you’re more likely to stop when you’re full.

Emotional eating can leave behind feelings of guilt; eating when you are physically hungry does not.

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2425 S. Volusia Ave. Suite B2 • Orange City, Florida • 32763

WORKSHOP Topics for Speeches and Workshops

Each of these topics can also be turned into workshops custom designed for your group or event. I make them interactive as this enhances the experience making it more memorable and fun. I can design the workshops to focus on specific issues and groups of people who may be experiencing challenges at work and in their private lives. How trauma affects the human brain Stress management Communicating for effectiveness Living your Fullest Life Facing Your Fear and Do It Anyway Anger management Domestic Violence, the effects on the family & safety planning How to Best Manage Your Anxiety What Do You Do when Your Loved One is an Addict What Do You Do When Your use of Alcohol or Drugs is Becoming a Problem

For more information please contact us at 386-492-0778

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Pillars of Health

The 6 Pillars of Health is about personal transformation and creating the life you want. We encourage holistic health and a balanced life style.The 6 Pillars of Health focus on the areas of emotional, physical, financial, nutritional, spiritual health and creating legacy. Are you looking for more joy in your life? More peace? To make deeper connections with people with whom you resonate? Would you like to re-invent yourself or even find yourself again? I started this group to create a forum where like-minded people can come together and learn from each other and give each other support to become who they truly are capable of becoming. I have gathered, and continue to gather, experts from the 6 pillars who once a month present on a topic from one of the pillars.

Services • Focus group with access to specialists in each of the 6 Pillars. • Sign up for a year long commitment to revamp your life in each area. We cycle through each area twice during the year. • Each month we focus on one pillar with a workshop the first week of the month by a handpicked trainer. • 30-minute monthly coaching call with Karin Weiri- Kolle, LMFT • Small closed group • You will be assigned an accountability partner. • $200.00/month Our Mission It is our mission at 6 Pillars to provide a forum for people who are ready to make a transition in their lives. We are here to help you make magic from choice and become the conscious co-creator of your life.

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Our Vision We are creating a community built on love and gratitude where we choose to live a life based on our highest potential. Coming from this place we believe that we are raising the vibration of each individual which spreads into the rest of our world like ringlets in the water. Hence we become the change that we want to see in the world which then inspires others to do the same.

Areas Served • Web ba ed prog am.

• In person services are available in the Volusia County area of Central Florida. (And where ever our affiliates are located)

Are you looking for more joy in your life?

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It’s usually not easy to end the dependency or addiction to drugs and alcohol – but with help its easier. We provide help to people who’ve realized on their own they need the help, or have been ordered by a court to do so. Dependency and addiction are illnesses. It is more effective to treat people with these problems as patients who need help, than as criminals if they’ve had legal problems. Most people who are dependent or addicted are self-medicating for emotional problems under the surface, that have yet to be resolved. Once the root causes of the illness is resolved, the dependence and addiction are much easier to let go of. SUBSTANCE ABUSE USE ABUSE ABUSE AB E BUSE US Substance Abuse – Drug and Alcohol Rehabilitation Therapy

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We are licensed by the Department of Children and Families to run adult outpatient substance abuse treatment.

We provide substance evaluations for court, probation, Department of Motor Vehicle, Sunshine Safety Council (DUI’s), attorneys, and employers. Urine analyses are completed at the time of evaluation. Our group therapy programs are outpatient based. This basically means you still live at home but visit our offices for treatment. Treatment generally runs for 12 weeks, depending on the need of the individual, and random urine analyses occur. Weekly attendance at either

Payment for substance evaluation and treatment is cash, debit or credit.

Call our office at 386-492-0778, or use our handy contact form.

Prices for Outpatient Substance Abuse Group Treatment, Rehab

(Spanish speaking therapist on Saturdays)

Duration: 12 – 20 weeks depending on level of use and # of criminal charges/DUI’s.

Evaluation and Urine Analysis ……...…………………..$55.00

AA or NA meetings are required as part of the treatment. Generally

Group ………………………………………………………..$25.00

treatment is provided in a group setting, however, individual sessions may also be beneficial.

30 min Individual session (1 x mo) ……....…………….$30.00

Random UA (1 x mo) …………………....……………….$20.00

“It is better to light a candle than curse the darkness.”

Search Terms: Orange City Therapists, FL, Counselors, Deltona Therapist, Port Orange Therapy, Port Orange FL Counseling, Counselors, Debary, Daytona Beach, EMDR Therapist, Volusia County Florida Counseling, Rehab, Mental Health, Drug Rehabilitation, Family Counseling, Substance Abuse Treatment, Outpatient, Probation, PTSD Treatment, Military Veterans, Drug Treatment, EMDR Therapy.

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Discrimination, whether based on race, gender, or sexual orientation, has long been thought to be a contributor to substance abuse. Now a new study has confirmed the relationship between discrimination and addiction, but it’s also brought up many more questions that still need to be answered in order to improve treatment outcomes. Researchers at the University of Iowa recently completed a peer review study in which they looked at 97 previous studies on discrimination and alcohol use. Their goal was to summarize the collective knowledge researchers have uncovered throughout the years, and what they found confirmed in more detail what many had previously suspected.

“Generally there is good scientific support, but the evidence is mixed for different groups

and for types of discrimination.” - Dr.Paul Gilbert, University of Iowa

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overtly racist or sexist to another person. But less research has been done on what are known as micro-aggressions, small everyday occurrences that can rub a person the wrong way. That research is improving, but there are other factors that need to be more fully explored. While studies have looked at historical trauma in the African-American population, the concept has not been fully investigated with regards to Hispanic and Asian populations. “This notion of historic trauma could be really relevant to other groups, but it hasn't received much attention at all,” Dr. Gilbert says. “This is something we should pay attention to.” All of this adds up to the fact that treatment providers may be missing a key piece of the substance abuse puzzle.

The team found that discrimination did indeed lead to an increase in drinking frequency, quantity of alcohol consumed, and in the risk for alcohol use disorders. Researchers say drinking can represent a coping mechanism in response to the stress caused by discrimination, and several studies showed clients acknowledging this direct link themselves. But when looking at specific populations and types of discrimination, the picture becomes less clear. “The story is that generally there is good scientific support, but the evidence is mixed for different groups and for types of discrimination,” says Dr. Paul Gilbert, the study’s lead author. “We don’t really know comparing one type or one level to another.” For example, much research has been done on interpersonal discrimination where someone is

But just because the intricacies of how discrimination affects drinking aren’t yet fully understood, that doesn’t mean our current knowledge base can’t be helpful. Dr. Gilbert says simply knowing that experiences with discrimination can drive drinking could inform the way treatment providers interact with clients, opening new areas of their lives to explore during treatment. “It can serve as sort of an early warning or indicator,” Dr. Gilbert says. “For treatment providers, it’s worth looking at: is there something that may be keeping folks from accessing services or affecting outcomes?”

Dr. Gilbert says treatment providers should continue to address discrimination as part of a holistic approach to recovery. He says it will be up to researchers to fill

in the gaps to find the precise ways that discrimination affects drinking behavior. “We’ve got good evidence on this level of interpersonal discrimination,” Dr. Gilbert says. “We’ve gotten the low-hanging fruit, now it’s time to start working on the stuff that’s a little further up the tree.”

“It can serve as sort of an early warning or indicator.”

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KarinWeiri, LMFT is a certified collaborative divorce professional. What is a collaborative divorce? This is a process where both parties are willing to negotiate their differences and settle outside of court, hence avoiding the stress and cost of litigation in court. Each person hires their own attorney and there is a licensed therapist and a financial planner on the team who are all trained and certified in the collaborative divorce proceedings.The process is a step-by-step structure that is followed in these cases. First you meet with your attorney and your spouse meets with their attorney where you discuss your goals and limits.Then the four of you meet and in between will be meetings set up with the therapist and the financial planner.

What are the benefits of the collaborative divorce? • Saves money • Informal setting • Information exchange is free, open, informal, and honest • Saves time • You can decide now how to handle post- settlement disputes • You negotiate results that work for you and everyone involved. The collaborative divorce is especially beneficial if you have many assets and if you have children as you are there to focus on what is in the best interest of the children and learn how to continue to work together as co-parents post- settlement. In addition to this I run a monthly FREE Compassionate Divorce Recovery group. Sign up and join us at https://www.meetup. com/Orange-City-Divorce-Support- Meetup/

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Bend But Don’t Break Yoga is being used to help people maintain recovery and avoid relapse

Yoga is no longer exercise your annoying, health-conscious friend won’t stop talking about.The ancient practice is now being used to help people recover from addiction. While scholars estimate yoga was developed sometime around 300 to 400 B.C., the practice hasn’t stopped changing over the last 2,000 years. A new wave of yogis are now helping people in recovery connect their spiritual and physical sides through yoga by combining the practice with more traditional 12-step elements. “It’s just a way of coming back to a sense of wholeness,” says Nikki Myers, a yoga therapist who helped develop the 12-step yoga system. “We use yoga as a process in order to bring that reintegration.”

Myers says she developed the system primarily as a means of relapse prevention. She says a typical 12-step yoga session would begin the same way most 12- step meetings do, with a focus on sharing and discussion of important recovery topics. Once the “meeting” portion of the session is over, the group will then move into a series of yoga poses designed to help participants focus on their physical recovery. “A focus needs to be on the body- based piece as well as the cognitive piece in order for wholeness to really be manifested,”Myers says. “Once you include those things, the whole idea is that these will begin to offer us a set of tools that we can use both on the mat in the yoga practice and off the mat when the triggers of life show up.”

“It’s just a way of coming back to a sense of wholeness.” - Nikki Myers, yoga therapist

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The right tools Myers says the idea that yoga can provide a set of tools is critical as the practice of yoga is much more than the poses themselves. She says there’s also a focus on breathing techniques, a meditation of sorts, and a connection to one’s physical reactions that can prove vital when faced with difficult circumstances. Myers recalls how one woman who participated in 12-step yoga later found herself in a very stressful situation at home with her kids misbehaving and everything going wrong. She said she could feel the negativity boiling up inside her. It was the kind of stress that had triggered her to drink in the past, but the woman said in that moment she was able to relax and calm herself by focusing on her breathing and remembering the feeling of tranquility she had experienced in class. “It had a way of creating a space, giving her tools to create a space between her reactions and instead take a different neural pathway,”Myers says. “These are the kind of tools that we’re looking to have people use.” “A focus needs to be on the body-based piece as well as the cognitive piece in order for wholeness to really be manifested.” - Nikki Myers

Not a replacement Myers is quick to point out that yoga is not a substitute for traditional 12-step support, but rather an additional measure that some people may find helpful. She says some people have pushed back against the practice, but others have been enthusiastic about its power, with classes spreading across the country and even internationally. Myers says she hopes that one day 12-step yoga will be as common as other treatment programs. But she says as long as people are maintaining sobriety and finding wholeness within themselves, she’ll be proud of the difference her system has made. “We’ll tell people, ‘Notice this in your body, what it really feels like,’” Myers says. “Healing only happens in safe space.”

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EMDR

THERAPY

What is EMDR therapy and how does it work?

EMDR is the acronym for Eye Movement Desensitization and Reprocessing. It was created by Francine Shapiro in 1987 and is now recommended by the Department of Veteran’s Affairs, the American Psychiatric Association, and most recentlyWorld Health Organization as very effective and efficient at helping people process traumatic events.

For more information please contact us at 386-492-0778 INSIGHTSCOUNSELINGCENTER.COM

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“At first I was scared to attend counseling, but I fell in love with Insights. My life needed to change and I just needed someone to talk to. Insights has helped me in many ways, specifically how to open up and talk and know that people are there to listen to matter what. My outlook on life has improved. I have already referred others to Insights Counseling and will continue to do so!” -Dana

FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE CONTACT US AT 386-492-0778

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6 Pillars of Health

2425 S. Volusia Ave. Suite B2 • Orange City, Florida • 32763

THE 6 PILLARS OF HEALTH IS ABOUT PERSONAL TRANSFORMATION AND CREATING THE LIFE YOU WANT.

386-492-0778 CALL TODAY

Are you looking for more joy in your life? More peace? To make deeper connections with people with whom you resonate? Would you like to re-invent yourself or even find yourself again?

I started this group to create a forum where like-minded people can come together and learn from each other and give each other support to become who they truly are capable of becoming. I have gathered, and continue to gather, experts from the 6 pillars who once a month present on a topic from one of the pillars.

INSIGHTSCOUNSELINGCENTER.COM

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