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no one suggested that she should not be treated because she was “getting what she deserved,” he said. “Yet somehow, if it’s heroin or cocaine or alcohol, we say, ‘Ahh, they decided that, they’re getting what they deserve,’” Christie remarked. HOW ADDICTION WORKS After satisfying basic human needs like food, water, sleep and safety, people feel pleasure. That pleasure is brought by chemical releases in the brain. This is according to Columbia researchers, who note that the disease of addiction causes the brain to release high levels of those pleasure chemicals. Over time, brain functions of reward, motivation and memory are altered. After these brain systems are compromised, those with addiction can experience intense cravings for substance use, even in the face of harmful consequences. These changes can stay in the brain long after substance use desists. The changes may leave those struggling with addiction to be vulnerable to “physical and environmental cues they associate with substance use, also known as triggers, which can increase their risk of relapse,” write Columbia researchers. no ne sug ested that she should not be treated because she was “getting what she deserved,” he said. “Yet somehow, if it’s heroin or cocaine or alcohol, we say, ‘Ah , they decided that, they’re getting what hey deserve,’” Christie remarked. HOW AD ICTION WORKS After satisfying basic human e ds like fo d, water, sle p and safety, people fe l pleasure. That pleasure is brought by chemical rel ases in the brain. This is ac ording to Columbia researchers, who note that he disease of ad iction causes the brain to rel ase high levels of those pleasure chemicals. Over time, brain functions of reward, motivation and memory are alter d. After these brain systems are compromised, those with ad iction can experience intense cravings for substance use, even in the face of harmful consequences. These changes can stay in the brain long after substance use desi t . The changes may leave those strug ling with ad iction to be vulnerable to “physical and environmental cues they as ociate with substance use, also known as trig ers, which can increase their isk of relapse,” write Columbia researchers.

not just a bad habit It’s NOT JUSTA BAD HABIT

not just a bad habit treatment and continued monitoring and support or recovery.

THE COLUMBIA RESEARCHERS DO HAVE SOME GOOD NEWS: Even the most severe, chronic form of the disorder can be manageable and reversible, usually with long term

Recent research and dialogue in the political sphere have brought long-simmering questions about addiction to the forefront: Is addiction truly a disease? Do addicts deserve to be treated like people who have a Recent res arch and ialogue in the political spher have brought long-sim ering questions about ad iction to the fore: Is addiction truly a disease? Do addicts deserve to b tr ated like people who hav a dise s that’s outside their control? disease that’s outside their control? While most researchers agree with the so-called disease model of addiction, stereotypes and cultural bias continue to stigmatize those with addiction because they made an initial choice to consume substances. However, Columbia University researchers point out that “choice does not determine whether 34 While most res archers agre with the so-called isease model of ad iction, ster otypes and cultural bias continue to stigmatize those with ad iction because they made an initial choice to consume substances. However, Columbia University res archers point out that “choice does not det rmine whether

something is a disease. Heart disease, diabetes and some forms of cancer involve personal choices like diet, exercise, sun exposure, etc. A disease is what happens in the body as a result of those choices.” Experts say that applying the distinction of choice to addiction creates biases that justify inadequate treatment. It begs the question New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie asked during a 2015 town hall meeting in New Hampshire. When Christie’s mother was diagnosed something is a disease. Heart disease, diabet s and some forms of cancer involve personal choices like diet, exercise, sun exposure, etc. A disease is what hap ens in the body as a result of those choices.” Experts ay that ap lying the distinction of choice to ad iction creates biases that justify inadequate treatment. It begs the question New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie asked uring a 2015 town hall me ting in New Hampshire. When Christie’s mother was diagnosed with lung cancer at 71 as a result of addiction to tobacco, he noted that with lung cancer at 71 as a result of ad iction to tobacco, he noted that

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