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MAGAZINE

THE COMMUNITY ROLES OF THE BARBER SHOP AND BEAUTY SALON Leonard Freed & Magnum Photos, Inc

S ince the turn of the 19th century, beauty salons and barber shops have served as special places among African Americans. They have been places not only to get hair care services but locations where black people could be vulnerable and talk about issues of importance in the community. There were spaces where customers played games such as

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the United States. Coming to America (1988), Malcolm X (1992), and Barbershop (2002) are examples of films used to showcase African Americans’ unique relationships with barber and beauty shops.

chess, cards, and dominoes, while having conversations about local gossip, politics, and community affairs. Over the years, beauty salons and barber shops have come to provide a unique social function. Scholars often cite these sites as “sanctuaries” for black people. Many film adaptations of African American themes use these businesses to show black culture in

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https://nmaahc.si.edu/blog/community-roles-barber-shop-and-beauty-salon

WHAT THEY DIDN’T TELL YOU ABOUT THE BLACK BARBER IN AMERICA SOURCE: HTTPS://BLAVITY.COM/DIDNT-TELL-BLACK-BARBER-AMERICA Mr. Nnamdi says: “Used to be that you could get a shave and a haircut for two bits, and for that price you got more than a trim and a fresh face. You also got a place to air your opinions, connect with neighbors, and a way of supporting a local business. An experience both tangible and intangible and of value in any community but perhaps especially so in African American barbershops.” Barbershops have been a cornerstone in the African American community for decades. Around 1854, San O n an episode of the Kojo Nnamdi Show titled " e History of Black Barbershops,"

Francisco was home to 16 black-owned barber shops.

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In the era of Jim Crow, barbershops provided safe havens for men and women to talk, think and organize. Liberating themselves from a life of masks, they were able cultivate the culture that still resonates today within the barbershop. Civil Rights movements gained mass support and reach from barbershops. Community members both middle and lower class were able to congregate and socialize, strengthening the bond within the community and spreading the word. Fast forward several decades in the future, barbershops still remain staples in African-American communities. Men of all ages and social classes still gravitate to their favorite barbershop when it’s time for a fresh fade. Commerce and culture remain key focal points in the relevance of barbershops. Spirited debates, engaging conversations and news both local and national all contribute to the continued burgeoning of the barbershop culture. Clients come in expecting excellent service married to the uniquely local experience that is their shop. e personal connection they make with a barber grows deeper with every cut. e sense of belonging and identity followed by an amazing

haircut go a long way in building a generation of strong and conœdent black men. TODAY, BARBERS AND BARBER SHOPS ARE LIVING THROUGH A REVITALIZATION OF THEIR ARTISAN CRAFT. Trade shows and expos are ushering in a new wave of barbers. ere is a sharper focus on honing skills and educating themselves on the industry and its nuances. In the '70s barbers were tested by the sheer number of people embracing afros and dreadlocks. No haircuts meant no proœts. at trend eventually faded, and barbers resumed cutting the heads that œlled their seats. Today, men’s grooming has regained its momentum within society. Natural hair is the new trend going against the grain of traditional hair care. However with a new-age twist, this style is perfected by a visit to your barber. Both technology and culture trends have spurred this movement. A man’s haircut deœnes his personality and style. Always has been and will continue to. Technology has made it much easier for men to stay current on latest trends and improve their grooming standards. Each trend fueling the renaissance that is men’s grooming, modernizing the barbershop experience.

During the 1860s, a former slave, Peter Briggs, eŽectively monopolized the barber shop market in Los Angeles on his own. Barbering was a source of wealth for those who catered to the higher-end clientele. Barbershop ownership was the path to a“uence for the black man. One out of every eight black men considered to be wealthy owned a barber shop, with a net worth exceeding $2,000 (equivalent to around $55,000 today).

White customers felt sharing barbers with a black man bestowed too much social equity upon the race, resulting in many black patrons being excluded from their shops. is, in turn, led to many wealthy black barbers being despised and ostracized by their communities. In the 1890s, German and Italian immigrants saw the wealth generated by African Americans and decided to claim their stake. ey took to “professionalize” the trade by requiring all barbers attend an accredited barber college. e Germans formed a barber union, allowing them to lobby for barbering licenses and anatomy training. In eŽect, re-skilling an already skilled profession — which in turn forced many blacks out of the profession. At the same time, Gillette Safety Razor was founded. From its birth in 1903, Gillette Safety Razor redeœned what it meant to be a barber. By introducing a line of home shaving products, they transitioned the responsibility of shaving from the barber to the customer, reducing the visits to your local barbershop. THE TURN OF THE CENTURY BROUGHT ABOUT A NEW GENERATION OF BLACK BARBERS. Individuals who did not care to cater to those outside their community. As the Great Depression approached, these entrepreneurs looked at barbering as a means to freedom both œnancial and social. ALONZO HERNDON SOURCE: HTTPS://WWW.GEORGIAENCYCLOPEDIA.ORG/ ARTICLES/BUSINESS-ECONOMY/ALONZO-HERNDON-1858-1927

SOURCE: HTTPS://WWW.GOOGLE.COM/SEARCH?Q=BARBERSHOP+HISTORY&SOURCE=LNMS&TBM=ISCH&SA=X&VED= 0AHUKEWIKSUDALNPAAHUR4YMKHVNYAESQ_AUICIGB&BIW=2560&BIH=1321#IMGRC=YOXCUWH7V-UFYM:

Mounting growing competition from German and Italian immigrants, African Americans provided top quality service coupled with a œrst class experience winning the business of white patrons. As a profession, barbering quickly elevated in status. Black barbers, with their artisan touch, won the market cementing their role in society. Barbershops drew their strength and inžuence from the African-American communities in which they operated. eir commitment to one another fostered spaces of trust and self-expression, giving birth to the barbershop culture today. Barbers worked within their community, selectively grooming apprentices, maintaining a superior level of service, and controlling entry into the profession. e luxury experience they provided to their white customers went unmatched by the competition. First-class amenities œll their shops, earning them access to coveted parlors locations. SOURCE: HTTPS://WWW.GOOGLE.COM/SEARCH?Q=BARBERSHOP+HISTORY& SOURCE=LNMS&TBM=ISCH&SA=X&VED=0AHUKEWIKSUDALNPAAHU R4YMKHVNYAESQ_AUICIGB&BIW=2560&BIH=1321#IMGRC=IHZFT9HU CHMLNM:

Luxury hotels and photography studios were home to many black-owned barbershops. From carpeted žoors to laced window drapings, fancy chairs and upholstered furniture to centerpiece pianos, barbershops housed much of the decor which would later become hallmarks of the Victorian home. Hot baths, perfumed soaps, cigars, and the air of exclusivity were all part of the allure so desired by their white patrons. NOT ONLY WERE BLACK MEN SKILLED BARBERS, THEY WERE ALSO FANTASTIC ACTORS. Out of necessity, they became masters of playing the server role. W.E.B Dubois coined a term "double conscious," to describe this phenomenon, “of always looking at one's self through the eyes of others, of measuring one's soul by the tape of a world that looks on in amused contempt and pity.” Black barbers understood the limitations of their time period, yet were able to capitalize on their unique opportunity. Turning the trope of “black inferiority,” for which has plagued them into their most valuable asset. e ability to “wear the mask” made black barbers a lot of money in the 19th century. As they amassed more wealth, their status continued to rise, as did their notoriety. Barbers such as John Merrick of Durham, who later founded North Carolina Mutual Insurance, self-funded the principal investment from the proœts earned from his barbershop. He was the barber of the dukes, tobacco magnets of the Carolinas. Alonzo Herndon of Atlanta also beneœted from his wealthy white patronage. He served the white industrialists who moved to Georgia’s capital, with hopes to build the New South. For most of the century, these barbers exclusively cut only white customers, trading deference for dollars.

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KYNARD BARBER SHOP 863 CENTRAL AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43610 PHONE: (419) 248-9317 SUPREME CUTZ BARBERSHOP 2620 AIRPORT HWY #3, TOLEDO, OH 43609 PHONE: (419) 377-7179 T LINE UP BARBER SHOP C. 709 N REYNOLDS RD, TOLEDO, OH 43615 PHONE: (419) 725-9762 TAPERS BARBER DORR ST, TOLEDO, OH 43607 P & J'S DA SHOP 422 E BROADWAY ST, TOLEDO, OH 43605 PHONE: (419) 593-0078

H D BARBERSHOP 3051 DORR ST, TOLEDO, OH 43607 PHONE: (419) 536-6331 KLIPPER KINGS 1122 N BYRNE RD TOLEDO, OHIO 43607 PHONE: (419) 536-5764 FOSTER'S HAIR CONCEPTS UNLIMITED 1645 W BANCROFT ST, TOLEDO, OH 43606 PHONE: (419) 242-7889 STEVE'S SPORT-N-CUTS 4925 DORR ST, TOLEDO, OH 43615 PHONE: (419) 537-1117 NICK'S BARBER SHOP 500 MADISON AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43604 PHONE: (419) 241-5431

C€RK'S BARBER & BEAUƒSHOP 1723 N D„ROIT AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43607 PHONE: (419) 241-3753 HOBBS BARBER SHOP 636 N D„ROIT AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43607 PHONE: (419) 243-2195 …RST CHAIR BARBER SƒLING 1553 WESTERN AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43609 PHONE: (419) 720-2920 T†GOLDEN RAZOR BARBER SHOP 3205 CENTRAL AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43606 PHONE: (419) 535-3061 BLENDZ BARBER SHOP 5835 DORR ST, TOLEDO, OH 43615 PHONE: (419) 578-9440

ADLINES 2724 W SYLVANIAAVE, TOLEDO, OH 43613 PHONE: (419) 474-7224 J P S†LZ 3501 UPTON AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43613 PHONE: (419) 471-9555 2237 ASHˆND AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43620 PHONE: (419) 255-8463 LIDDE'S BARBER SHOP 921 JUNCTION AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43607 PHONE: (419) 242-2042 OPERATIONZ BARBERSHOP 1824 N REYNOLDS RD, TOLEDO, OH 43615 PHONE: (419) 407-0880 GOOD TIMES BARBER SHOP

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ACUTABOVE: HOWBLACK BARBERSHOPS SUPPORTTHEIR COMMUNITIES Anthonia Akitunde • Founder, mater mea • FEBRUARY 07, 2014 https://www.americanexpress.com/us/small-business/openforum/articles/a-cut-above-how-black-barbershops-support-their-communities/

Ask barber Dennis “Denny Moe”Mitchell how he found his life’s calling at age 14, and he’s already got the answer queued up and ready to go. It’s a story you can tell the 48-year-old has told many times before, but that it’s also one he still delights in telling. “I was in ROTC in high school,” he begins, turning his clippers o‚ and inspecting his latest customer’s beard for symmetry. “And I was on my way to an oƒcer’s ball. I don’t remember what I was looking for, but I found it. I found a pair of clippers in my mother’s drawer and took ‘em out and cut my hair.When I went to the ball, everybody was complimenting me like, ‘Nice cut!’" “A friend of mine saw me and said, ‘Yo, who cut your hair?’” he continues. “He said, ‘Why don’t you cut me and my son’s hair? If you can cut yours that well, you can cut ours even better.’” And just like that, Denny Moe—so named because “everybody who was big time had two names”—became a go-to barber in his North Carolina community with an enviable clientele of devoted customers. He went door-to-door trimming and lined up friends and neighbors before a local barbershop scooped him up to work for them. After a rival business called the barber inspector on Denny Moe, he paid the $75 •ne and eventually returned home to New York City, where, thanks to his aunt Margret Ann Hall's urging, he got his barber’s license at 16 and started working, legally this time, in a barbershop. “I was actually afraid; I didn’t know what I was going to do when I got out of school,” he says. “I didn’t realize I had it in my hand the entire time.šere was no turning back.” Decades later, after doing hair and security on nationwide tours for R&B singers like Keith Sweat and Bobby Brown and repeatedly hearing, “When are you going to open a shop?”

“The black barbershop and beauty shop’s origins can be traced back to the early 18th century, when enslaved men and women acting as plantation barbers and hairstylists would groom fellow slaves on Sunday mornings to get ready for Sunday church services, the only leisure time they had for proper grooming”

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“You know how you did it last time I was here?” he asks, taking a look at the right then left side of his face in the mirror. “Real skinny?” “Yeah,” the young man says, settling back into his chair. “I’m trying to look sleek.” Click.še clippers whirr again. “I got you.” "I've been going [to Denny Moe] since I was 15 years old, and I'm 45," says Teddy "Ruxpin" Parker, the owner and operator of entertainment management company, Ruxpin Entertainment (Denny Moe gave Parker his nickname, one of his tricks to remember customer names). "He's the best barber in the world, hands down. He always tells me, 'I can't make you look good, but I can make you good to look at.' He said that to me when I was 15 years old, •rst time I got in his chair. And that was it for me." "še cool thing about being a barber is that every haircut is di‚erent," says Denny Moe, Jr., whose chair is right next to his father's. "I can cut the same person over and over again, but it will never come out looking exactly the same. It's the task of getting it barbershop and his belief in giving back, Denny Moe is a pillar in the community. He has someone to come in and teach children how to play chess, o‚ers a scholarship program and health screenings, and hosts Cutting for a Cure, a 48-hour haircut-a-thon with 12 barbers from around the world to raise awareness about health disparities in underserved community, where the community where you need it to be." Due to the success of his

can be screened for treatable and curable diseases. Men and women from all walks of life come by the store to get a variety of treatments done, from shaves to hair color. "I think it's a place where men can come and relax and wind down. You know, do their man thing," says Carol McClendon, who has been cutting hair since the mid '90s. "I love the conversations that we have, because we talk about a variety of di‚erent topics. It's a home. It's a hangout. And we always make everyone feel welcome." Preet Nagra, 26, of Vancouver, Canada, •rst heard about Denny Moe's from the shop's viral appearance onWhat Would You Do? He visited the shop while in town for the Super Bowl for a haircut and beard trim. Due to the diversi•cation in Harlem, Denny Moe's clientele includes many more nonblack tourists and newcomers to the neighborhood from countries like Portugal, New Zealand, France and Denmark. Denny Moe calls barbering a recession-proof business, saying his shop weathered the economic crisis well. "I had a lot of people a‚ected, but it didn't a‚ect me because you got to get a haircut if you're going to a job or going to an interview." "Once I turned these clippers on, I've never turned back and I've never wanted for anything," Denny Moe says. "še bottom line is once people realize they can get a good haircut, what else is there?"

A turning point occurred in the late 1890s, due to some politicking from white entrepreneurs, Mills explains. “šeWhite Barbers Union, which formed in 1870, started lobbying state legislators for licensing laws which would require anyone seeking to be a barber to go to barber colleges,” he says. “It was one way to create some exclusivity to the trade, but the research shows it was one way for whites to compete with blacks for [the] lucrative white male market. šat pushed black barbers into black neighborhoods.” From there, black barbershops evolved to become diverse and virtually unshakable anchor businesses in the community, providing a space for entertainment and safety for those in the neighborhood, and a space for economic opportunity for other entrepreneurs: barbers who rent out chairs in the shop and street vendors who stop by knowing there’s always a waiting customer base to pitch their wares to. Denny Moe squints his eyes a bit, and moves his head from side to side to inspect his handiwork.še young man sitting in his chair makes the same motion as well.

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Denny Moe decided to do just that. He saved up $100,000 from working with celebrity and everyday clients, and opened Denny Moe’s Superstar Barbershop on January 14, 2006. Almost nine years later, the shop is now regularly considered one of the best barbershops in Harlem and in New York City. (It was recently featured in an episode of ABC News' hidden camera programWhat Would You Do?; according to Denny Moe, more than 30 million viewers tuned in.) še black barbershop’s history, much like Denny Moe’s own story, is one of serendipity. Many see the black barbershop as a space for grooming and community-building discussions, but overlook its role as a source of economic empowerment in American history, says Quincy T. Mills, a history professor at Vassar College and author of Cutting Along

the Color Line: Black Barbers and Barber Shops in America. “We have to account for the marketplace economy inside the barbershop along [with it being] the space where men can come and talk,”Mills explains. “It’s because of the entrepreneur's drive that we get the barbershop space.” še black barbershop and beauty shop’s origins can be traced back to the early 18th century, when enslaved men and women acting as plantation barbers and hairstylists would groom fellow slaves on Sunday mornings to get ready for Sunday church services, the only leisure time they had for proper grooming, according to Mills. Early barbershops were essentially the original black-owned businesses; free and enslaved African-Americans hired out by their masters “seized the opportunity to become entrepreneurs in an industry void of white

competition, with minimal startup costs and signi•cant pro•t potential,” he writes. However, unlike the Denny Moes of today, many of these early shops were for white patrons only. “šese barbers would turn away black customers who were trying to get haircuts,”Mills says, “mostly because their white customers did not want to be shaved next to a black man being shaved—that spoke too much of racial equality to them.šese barbers grew quite wealthy shaving white men ... and they were key •gures in the antislavery movement.šey would often help fugitive slaves who were passing through. Many of those things happened after the shop closed.”

J P S†LZ 3501 UPTON AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43613 PHONE: (419) 471-9555

KYNARD BARBER SHOP

BARBER SHOPS IN TOLEDO (CONT’D)

863 CENTRAL AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43610 PHONE: (419) 248-9317 SUPREME CUTZ BARBERSHOP 2620 AIRPORT HWY #3, TOLEDO, OH 43609 PHONE: (419) 377-7179 T LINE UP BARBER SHOP C. 709 N REYNOLDS RD, TOLEDO, OH 43615 PHONE: (419) 725-9762 TAPERS BARBER DORR ST, TOLEDO, OH 43607 P & J'S DA SHOP 422 E BROADWAY ST, TOLEDO, OH 43605 PHONE: (419) 593-0078 ADLINES ADDRESS: 2724 W SYLVANIAAVE, TOLEDO, OH 43613 PHONE: (419) 474-7224

GOOD TIMES BARBER SHOP

2237 ASHˆND AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43620 PHONE: (419) 255-8463 LIDDE'S BARBER SHOP 921 JUNCTION AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43607 PHONE: (419) 242-2042 OPERATIONZ BARBERSHOP 1824 N REYNOLDS RD, TOLEDO, OH 43615 PHONE: (419) 407-0880 MAKING T CUT BARBERSHOP 16 HIWYCK DR, TOLEDO, OH 43615 BARBER BROT RS 2110 N HOAND SYLVANIA RD, TOLEDO, OH 43615 EXQUISITE CUTS 5353 DORR ST, TOLEDO, OH 43615 PHONE: (419) 376-6814

MY BARBERS PˆCE 801 NEBRASKAAVE, TOLEDO, OH 43607 PHONE: (419) 255-9111 KYMZ KU‹I N UP 12 E BANCROFT ST #102A TOLEDO, OH 43620 PHONE: (419) 242-0991 GOLD KUTZ C 3558 STICKNEY AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43608 PHONE: (419) 490-8741 SCO‹'S BARBERSHOP 307 FASSŽT ST, TOLEDO, OH 43605 PHONE: (419) 304-0092 AURE BARBERSHOP 5751 GAY ST, TOLEDO, OH 43613 HOURS: CLOSES SOON: PHONE: (419) 724-2377

SALON ONYX 123 N MICHIGAN ST, TOLEDO, OH 43604 PHONE: (419) 243-6699 AD DOCTORS 2508 COINGWOOD BLVD, TOLEDO, OH 43610 PHONE: (419) 241-9047 HAIR TRENDZ BARBER & BEAUˆ 1339 DORR ST, TOLEDO, OH 43607

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ocal hair salon owner Tammy Herod and creative writing MFA candidate Julian Randall will lead campus’ “Barber Shop and Beauty Shop Talk” this afternoon at the Residence Hall 2 Student Commons. The Center for Inclusion and Cross Cultural Engagement, UM NAACP and Queer People of Color are sponsoring the 5 p.m. public forum as a part of the university’s Black History Month calendar. The event is meant to encourage discussion about issues facing the black community locally and nationally. Participants are invited to share stories and connect with others, all while enjoying refreshments and receiving free beauty tips and hair “line-ups” from a local barber. African-American community Posted on Feb 21 2018 - 7:59am by Devna Bose L ‘Barber Shop and Beauty Shop Talk’ encourages conversation about issues facing

“In our community, that’s one of our top priorities. We don’t do certain things if we don’t have our hair done, It’s just a big deal.”

Malik Pridgeon, president of the Ole Miss chapter of Queer People of Color, also acknowledged the role of barbershops in the lives of black people. “Barbershops are essential spaces for black men and women. Repeatedly throughout history, they have been a space for us and by us,” he said. “They are Mecca, if you will, for almost every black/brown American and play a central role in the black American experience.” Though he realizes their significance, Pridgeon said he has had a different experience with barbershops in America. He said his perspective as a member of the LGBTQ community has negatively painted his times in barbershops. “As a queer man of color, barbershops have always been a place where I’ve been forced to go back into the closet. Whereas masculinity, in general, is fragile, black masculinity is even more fragile,” he said. “I am hoping that we can address the dangers of hyper-masculinity and examine it from the perspectives of queer people as well as women.” Pridgeon said these conversations are important on campus because they highlight black Americans’ societal contributions and prove the diversity of the community’s many narratives. He said he and QPOC decided to support today’s event in order to shift the direction of the conversation and to highlight how unwelcome barbershops can be to same-gender-loving men, especially the “flamboyant” ones. Randall said he is looking forward to talking about the numerous issues the black community faces in barbershops as well as outside of them. “I’ve never had the opportunity to publicly discuss it at length in a forum,” he said. “I’m excited to have that conversation with a bunch of strangers for the first time since my last haircut.”

platform allow a conversation like that to be official.” Calling it a “Barber Shop and Beauty Shop Talk” was an intentional decision – the implications and significance of hair salons and hair care in the black community are a major part of African-American culture. Randall said the first place he ever heard about the concept of reparation was in a barbershop. “In a barbershop, it was all black men. It was where I did a certain kind of growing up. Ever since I was little, I went to black-owned hair care places,” he said. “The main point is that I think that barbershops, historically, are one of the only places consistently in American history where black people deserve something or are allowed to deserve something. There, whiteness is an anomaly.” Today’s discussion will nod to the idea of barbershops as places where black people are allowed to be unapologetically black and can express their views without dissent. The forum will serve as a

similar venue for free expression. “Blackness has to prove itself to enter the barbershop, compared to any other public space in America where we have to prove our docility. We have to prove that we are not violent. That is not true in a barbershop,” Randall said. “We are trying to facilitate a place where people are there and they can feel like they own it, even temporarily, to discuss what the world could look like and how it could be.” Herod, the other facilitator for the event and owner of Tammy’s Hair Gallery on University Avenue, also stressed the importance of hair and hair care in the black community. “In our community, that’s one of our top priorities. We don’t do certain things if we don’t have our hair done,” she said. “It’s just a big deal. Something my salon stresses is maintaining healthy practices, and we do all types of hair. Hair is hair.”

Edwin Aguilar, a graduate assistant for the CICCE, said that in past years, the university’s “barbershop” talk series was typically geared toward men to have a space to talk about whatever they need to. This week’s event marks the first forum to include “beauty shop” in its name. Aguilar described the event as a collaborative effort and something that is open to the whole campus. Randall said it is uncommon that the university officially sponsors a forum surrounding issues facing the black community. He also said the conversation will be focused on the concept of reparations for African-Americans but is open to the entire community. “I chose to talk about reparations because we need them. I’m always curious to know what everyone’s individual idea of liberation looks like, and these conversations are often only allowed to happen in the shadows,” he said. “Sometimes you get to have these conversations with your friends, but rarely does a university

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format designed to increase positive connections, personal and collective strength, and social competence. Clean Cut aims to counteract negative social and interpersonal forces that impede youth growth and development by promoting an emotionally safe environment within which youth and young adults can develop caring relationships and use authentic voices. Clean Cut is a strength-based mentoring approach to promote safe and healthy passage through pre-teen, adolescent and young adult years. Clean Cut addresses essential developmental needs for positive relationships and behaviors to help build leadership qualities individually and collectively. The Clean Cut Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Initiative is based on a Cognitive Behavioral Therapy model that has a variety of cognitive and behavioral techniques embedded throughout its theoretical framework design. The training provided by the community change mentoring initiative has been purposefully designed to embrace the unique and organic culture that exists within black barbershops. Clean Cut is overtly defined by its use of culturally relevant, organic project delivery strategies. Clean Cut borrows from a variety of psycho-dynamic modalities, including motivational interviewing, distorted thinking therapy, acceptance and commitment therapy, compassion focused therapy and solution focused therapy.

INITIATIVE MISSION The mission of the Clean Cut Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Initiative is to transform lives by using trained barbers as “community change mentors” to deliver an evidence- based curriculum to help youth and young adults change errant thinking and behaviors that will lead to enduring improvements in their mood and functioning in order to help them avoid substance abuse and violence. VISION We envision a world where every child and teen has access to adults and peers that help develop positive relationships as the foundation for healthy development. “Clean Cut Shops” will offer safe and consistent places for youth and young adults to navigate social-emotional challenges and to examine norms and cultural conditions that promote healthy adolescent formation. PURPOSE The Clean Cut Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Initiative has been created for youth and young adults to be able to experience a safe, welcoming and inclusive community that offers caring, support, and healthy connections to navigate relational and social-emotional challenges. These factors enable the development of increased resiliency and positive growth that helps youth and young adults avoid substance abuse and violence in spite of imposed negative cultural influences and adverse environmental factors. PROGRAM DESCRIPTION The Clean Cut Substance Abuse and Violence Prevention Initiative is an “organic barbershop mentoring” initiative for youth and young adults from 5 to 24 years of age. Clean Cut integrates resiliency building through social-emotional and communication skills training in a specific

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Mission Statement and other important info goes here...

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BARBER SHOPS IN TOLEDO

 CR'S HAIR DESIGN 1469 W SYLVANIAAVE, TOLEDO, OH 43612 PHONE: (419) 724-2280 COCOA'S BARBER & BEAU€SALON 1206 N HAWLEY ST, TOLEDO, OH 43607 PHONE: (419) 243-7301 GOLD KUTZWEST 2509 W SYLVANIAAVE, TOLEDO, OH 43613 PHONE: (419) 490-8741 TOLEDO BARBER CO…EGE 3301 UPTON AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43613 PHONE: (419) 671-8700 DA-SHOP 422 E BROADWAY ST, TOLEDO, OH 43605 PHONE: (419) 593-0078 MAKING T CUT 16 HI…WYCK DR, TOLEDO, OH 43615 PHONE: (419) 535-1636

BEAUTE` ASYLUM SALON 2011 GLENDALE AVE, TOLEDO, OH 43614 PHONE: (419) 389-9110 GENESIS BEAUSALON 1209 HOAG ST, TOLEDO, OH 43607 PHONE: (419) 241-4862

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What I'veLearned CuttingHair in jail “THEYLOOKTIRED,RAGGED,ANDSICK,MORESOTHANTHEYTHOUGHTTHEYWOULD.” By:ANDRELYONS • FILED10:00p.m. • 08.25.2016

Since they’re inthehole, theyhave theirarmsand legsshackled whenever they’reoutside theircells.As soonas theysitdown, the first thing I do is takeoutmymirrorandgive it to them. Formostof the inmates, it’s the first time they’veseentheir reflection in amonth—andthey’realways shocked. They look tired, ragged, and sick,moresothan they thought they would. Lotsof themwill saysomething like, “Man, I’mdead, canyoubringme back to life?” That’sexactlywhat I try todo.Haircuts in jail aresupposedtobea “one-guard”buzzcut against thegrain, but I’ll ask theguyshowtheywant theirsdone. Andwe talkabout all kindsof things, just likeat theregularbarbershop. The difference is, everyone I’mworkingon is trying tofindoutwhat thenews is insteadof swapping it. Theywant to knowwhat’sbeenhappening inthe outsideworld, if their teamwon,what’s goingonontheiroldunit. They talk abouthowtheymiss theirkids. Alittleoverayearago, I remember watchingtelevisionandseeingthat oneofWashingtonD.C.’spolice officershadbeenarrestedfor rape. Because itwasahigh-profilecase, and becausehewasacop, I suspectedhe wouldprobablybehoused inthehole. I thought about cuttinghishair.During my time in jail,myyoungestdaughter wasraped, and it filledmewithrage. I couldn'tbe there forher, andnowI despisedeveryrapist. Theprospectof cutting thisguy’shairwasmore than I couldtake. Whenthedaycame forme toactually do it, Iwasnervous.Everyother inmate toldmesimplynot tocut thecop’shair, andas theguards finallybrought him out, thewholeunitwasyellingatme fromall directions. Assoonas I sawhim, Iwantedto crackhisheadopenuntil itbled.

When I started, Iwasa littleroughwith hishead. Itwasclear theguywanted to talk, but I just cut himoff, askinghim howhewantedhishair.He feltmyvibe andstarted trying tomakeup for it by talkingevenmore—saying that he didn’tdo it, tellingmeheknewhowI felt. I stopped, lookedhimin theeye, and saidheprobablydidn’twant toknow howI felt. I toldhimaboutwhat happenedtomydaughter.Hestarted crying, snot comingout of hisnose. Wedidn’t talk for therestofhis time in thechair. Theworst partwas,when I finished, I think that hehad thebest-looking haircut out of everyone I didthatday. Nomatterwho theyare,when I’mdone cuttingan inmate’shairandshowthem the finishedproduct, theydon’twant to let themirrorgo. They’ll keep lookingat their reflection, saying they finally feel like themselvesagain. Lotsof times, they’ll offer topayme, but I’venever takenadime.Sometimes theguyswill jokearound, saying, “YouknowI’m goinghomeassoonas the judgesees thiscut!”Theguardswill occasionally havemecome inat irregular times, just tokeep thepeace—when it’sbeentoo longsince they’vehadahaircut, the mendowntherewill throwpissand shit at theofficersorbreak the sprinklers in theircells. The thing is, a cutmeansmore inprison than it does onthestreet, andthat’sespecially true inthehole. Thesemendon’t get totalk totheir families, don’t get anyvisits, and live inacage for23hoursaday. If they’re luckyenough togooutside, they’reonlyallowed tosit inanoutdoor cage. After threeyearsasapre-trial detainee, I finallygot sentencedandnowI’m waitingtohearwhere they’ll sendme. Wherever it is, I’mhopingtotakemy clippers.Everyprison is full ofguys whowould love tofeelmorehuman.

AndreLyons, 40,will be transferredfrom theCorrectional TreatmentFacility in WashingtonD.C. to a federal prison.He pleadedguilty toa chargeof conspiracy to distributedrugsand wassentencedto sevenyears.

Thisarticlewaspublished incollaborationwithVice. I get sent totheholeall the time.Notbecause I’vedonesomethingwrong, but because I’mthebarber,whichmeans I’malsothebest friendof everyguy in there. I cut everyone’shair, frommurderersandrapists tofirst-timersput infora fight.Whenyouenter thehole, it’sanewworld—one that smells likedeathand shit.Menareholleringat the topof their lungs tobe let out. Inmates in theholegethaircutsonlyonceamonth, andalsoonthedaybefore court—sowhen I’mthere, it’saspecial occasion.Assoonas theyhear thedoor totheirunitpopopenandseemecoming inwithmysupplies, everyonestarts cheering.All youcanhear is, “DRE,WHO’SFIRST?! I’MFIRST!MENEXT!” I let themknowthat I’mnot leavinguntil everyonegetsahaircut. Then I takeoutmy thingsandget towork. I arrangemystuffby theguard’sdesk, gettingtheclippersandbrushes positioned, andstackingthehard, redplasticchairsontopof eachother toget a littlemoreheight (I don’thaveabarber’schair that I canpumpupanddown). Then theofficersstart tobringpeopleoveroneat a time.

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By Kai Ryssda • January 28, 2014 | 5:03 PM

Black-owned barbershops are more than just places to get a shave and a haircut.eir position in American culture is well-known: ey're places to talk about the events of the day, to swap stories -- and, according to Vassar College history Professor Quincy Mills, to let African-American men become entrepreneurs. But it took barber shops the better part of a century to reach that quintessential place in black community life. Mills tells that history in a new book called Cutting Along e Color Line. Mills says the history of these barber shops is deeply entwined with the history of slavery. In the 19th century, he says, most black-owned barber shops served wealthy, white clients -- businessmen and politicians. "e black barbers were in many cases enslaved men, but also free blacks," Mills explains. Barbering became a way for some African-Americans "to †nd some little pockets to sort of †gure out how they could at least earn a little bit of money, and control their time -- which of course was what slaves did not have control over." at shifted in the late 1880s and 1890s, when a younger generation entered barbering.ey were born after emancipation and speci†cally opened shops in black communities to serve black men. Now, Mills says, it's hard to know what the place of black barber shops will be in our new, constantly

changing economy.e current political rhetoric is all about jobs -- and black barber shops simply don't employ many people. On the other hand, Mills points out that it's comparatively easy to become a barber. To open an entire shop only costs about $150,000. Because of that, he says, maybe their direct economic impact is not the most important thing. "So barbering still serves as that avenue for men, whether they want to own a barber shop or just work in [one]. But also, barber shops provide this sort of central hub, if you will, for communities across the country to understand the nature of their respective communities. And so I would argue that's just as vital to an economy as is the number of jobs one can generate." Follow Kai Ryssdal at @kairyssdal.

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https://www.marketplace.org/2018/04/23/tech/net-neutrality-rollback-begins

I

BARBERING AFTER

n the Somerset barbershop, spray bottles are lined beneath large mirrors reflecting dozens of men sitting in chairs for a snip or a shave. A colorful mural depicting the history of barbering covers the upper wall, and tunes flowing out of a nearby radio blend with low conversation. A bell rings and the freshly cut men change their barber uniforms and smocks for another matching outfit: maroon jumpsuits with D.O.C. lettered across the backs before exiting the guarded room. The State Correctional Institution in Somerset, like all but one prison in the state, houses a barber school, which prison officials consider one of the Department of Correction’s most successful vocational programs. Last year these state prisons facilitated the instruction of 36 new barbers and eight instructors in Pennsylvania. Such a license, which has recently become more accessible for those in prison,

For some it’s a new start, for others it’s a calltoserve ANNA SPOERRE PITTSBURGH POST-GAZETTE SEP 3, 2017 • 11:00 PM

complete the mandatory 1,250 hours of training before taking an exam. Mr. Cotroneo, who has been an instructor in the state’s prison system for almost three decades, said this often makes his students highly sought after. The Greensburg native who started as a self-employed barber said his family didn’t take too warmly to his applying to work in a prison back in 1988. “Those guys could have sharp scissors and might kill you or something,” he recalled his family warning him. “I didn’t listen to them, and I’m glad I didn’t,” he said with a chuckle. After 25 years at SCI Greensburg, Mr. Cotroneo was moved briefly to SCI Pittsburgh until its closure this year. In June he was transferred to Somerset. Mr. Cotroneo put about 30 barbers and 30 barber managers through the program over the years. He said many have kept in touch with him after prison, and many now own their own businesses thanks to their barber manager’s licenses. A call to ministry For the Rev. Earl Baldwin, of Beechview, the job of a barber is a spiritual one. Rev. Baldwin described his younger self as clueless and hard-headed, a product of the streets, when he met Mr. Cotroneo at SCI Greensburg in 1991 after being convicted of multiple robbery charges. “He saw my hunger and invited me to come down to the barbershop to learn the tricks of the trade, of the profession, and I went on and got my barber license,” Rev. Baldwin recalled. “He helped me when I was young and dumb and didn’t have a clue.” Years later, Rev. Baldwin is striving to be a similar mentor by offering up a place of refuge to the community’s youth.

allows the men to take over a barber chair or even their own shop immedi- ately upon their release. Outside of prison, this group of

ex-convict Pittsburgh barbers has become a community of sorts, where the men help one another restart and rebuild.

“Most shop owners out there know a guy who comes out

of a prison barber shop is highly skilled,” Alan Cotroneo said of his students, who practice on all types of hair to

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“God saw my heart and blessed my hand with a gift,” he said later in his shop, holding an electric razor up. “If you want to know who the kids trust, ask who cuts their hair.” A second chance “If you’re going to do anything while you’re incarcerated, it’s get your barber’s license,” Steven, who is also an inmate at the Somerset prison, recalls a friend advising him years ago. So he did. In fact, he went one step further, obtaining his manag- er’s license under the supervision of Mr. Cotroneo. Steven, whose last name the Department of Corrections requested not be disclosed, was a student in a previous state prison barber program who is now work- ing as a barber at SCI Somerset. Before being incarcerated in 1997 Steven was a masonry contractor. The now 46-year-old knew he needed to find a trade that could last him into his later years. He decided that barbering was his life’s calling. But for Steven, who was convicted of murder, the journey through the program wasn’t as easy as he’d hoped because of the violent crime in his past. In 2014, the Department of State began requiring criminal history be submitted as part of the applica- tion process. Licenses could be denied based on felony convic- tions or misdemeanors related to the barbering profession. This meant individuals, like Steven, who had already completed all of his hours, were unable to be approved to test right away for a manager’s license. “What it was doing was it was stockpiling a lot of inmates already in the program with violent cases. … They could not test,” Mr. Cotroneo said of the requirement change. So Steven took the matter to

In 2010, he opened Hallelujah Anyhow Gospel Talk Barber Shop on East Ohio Street. Though the building housing his North Side shop recently closed, Rev. Baldwin now has a chair at the back of Jalen’s Barber Shop on East Ohio Street. It’s not uncommon to find a boy occupying one of Rev. Baldwin’s chairs set up in a make-shift entertainment center, staring intently at the video game in front of him. “I try to be a light where I’m at to keep someone’s kid from going through what I went through,” said Rev. Baldwin, who had a few prison interludes when he was younger. The owner of Top Notch Styles later took Mr. Baldwin in as an apprentice. Mr. Baldwin calls his shop a safe place for young people to get off the streets and even make a few bucks sweeping for him. But he isn’t one to stay off the streets himself. Rev. Baldwin spent the evening of Aug. 8 standing in the center of a crowd of about 250 people in Perry South, urging them to take responsibility for helping to raise the young men in the community. He invited any men present to his shop later in the week to talk. “We need a strength that is greater than our own right now,” said Rev. Baldwin, who previously lost his brother and stepson to gun violence. “I’m getting tired of meeting out here. These black men and women are more than balloons and candles.” After the vigil, Rev. Baldwin stood in a grassy area near where the body of a young mother had been found two nights before. He threw a football back and forth with a young boy from the crowd. This, he said, is where the commu- nity must start reaching out to young men. Vigils and the barber shop.

court, arguing that because his crime has no affiliation with barbering, and because he had matured significantly in the past two decades, he should be allowed to test for the license. After a year of arguing his case in court from prison, and even getting a corrections officer to speak on his behalf, Steven was eventually granted a provisional manager’s license. Ian Harlow, commissioner of the Bureau of Professional and Occu- pational Affairs, said the barber board has always taken criminal histories into account. “At no time did a criminal history ever outlaw you from licensure,” said Mr. Harlow. “We treat every applicant on a case-by-case basis.” Mr. Harlow said in the past few years rumors have circulated that no one who is or was incarcerated could get a barber’s license. This, he said, was false, as it is not the intention to punish someone twice for the same crime. This is why late last year the barber board came up with probationary licenses -- as opposed to an unre- stricted license -- to allow those with prison records the chance to receive their license upon a review of their crime and progress in prison. The probationary license allows the licensees to practice their craft, reducing the chance of reoffending by giving them the chance to work. It also allows the board to monitor the licensees and take action should they reoffend or otherwise present a danger to the public’s health or safety. Steven’s minimum sentence was up in August, at which time he met with the parole board. Though he is still awaiting a decision about his sentence, he’s hopeful his good behavior and diligence in the barber program will aid in his early release. “I can only keep what I have by giving it away, and that’s what I’m trying to do,” Steven said. “I’m trying to give away what I’ve been so freely given, and I believe that’s going to make me a better person in the end.”

“HE SAW MY HUNGER AND INVITED ME TO COME DOWN TO THE BARBERSHOP TO LEARN THE TRICKS OF THE TRADE, OF THE PROFESSION, AND I WENT ON AND GOT MY BARBER LICENSE. HE HELPED ME WHEN I WAS YOUNG AND DUMB AND DIDN’T HAVE A CLUE.” - REV. BALDWIN EX-INCARCERATED BARBER

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